Aug. 9, 2022

Maximize Your Voice w/ Jodi Krangle

Maximize Your Voice w/ Jodi Krangle

Are you a podcaster or live streamer and ever wonder "How else can I use my skillset?" On today's show I'm excited to have Jodi Krangle on the show to dive into how you can maximize and diversify your voice for fun and business. This episode’s guest: 

👋 Jodi Krangle https://voiceoversandvocals.com/ 

✏️ Apply to be a guest: https:www.creatingdaily.live/guest  

👾 Creating Daily Discord: https://discord.gg/5ZxRnNVQCg 

👋 Let’s Connect: https://www.creatingdaily.live 

🔴 If you like this show, consider supporting it with a coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/billythorpe 

✅ Need help with your sponsorship strategy? billy@creatingformoney.com

Transcript
WEBVTT 1 00:00:06.000 --> 00:00:09.080 What is going on? I don't know why that cuts off so abruptly, 2 00:00:09.199 --> 00:00:13.279 but welcome to another episode of creating daily. I'm your host, Billy Thorpe. 3 00:00:13.320 --> 00:00:16.120 It is August nine. I can't even believe it. I cannot believe 4 00:00:16.160 --> 00:00:19.120 it's August nine, but having a lot of fun in the studio today, 5 00:00:19.199 --> 00:00:22.800 just in here creating, creating videos for Amazon, getting ready for the live 6 00:00:22.879 --> 00:00:27.879 show, planning podcast off signing sponsors. It's been a crazy busy day, 7 00:00:27.920 --> 00:00:31.000 so I hope you've had a very productive day as well. Welcome to the 8 00:00:31.039 --> 00:00:34.320 live show. I'm standing up. I know for some of you guys are 9 00:00:34.359 --> 00:00:36.880 like, why are you telling us this, but I get a standing desk 10 00:00:37.000 --> 00:00:40.600 finally and actually forgot about it for a week and then I'm sitting here I'm 11 00:00:40.600 --> 00:00:44.000 like, Oh wait, I should stand up and stand up for this interview 12 00:00:44.039 --> 00:00:46.920 to see if I have a little more energy, because I need more energy, 13 00:00:46.960 --> 00:00:49.719 as you guys all know. But if you're watching, feel free to 14 00:00:49.799 --> 00:00:53.640 jump into a chat near you and say hello. I got a very special 15 00:00:53.679 --> 00:00:57.719 guest on the show today. Jody Kranele is gonna be joining me in just 16 00:00:57.799 --> 00:01:00.600 a moment. She's spent fifteen years in voice over and we're gonna talk about 17 00:01:00.640 --> 00:01:04.719 maximizing our voice, using our skill set for more than just podcasting, more 18 00:01:04.719 --> 00:01:08.200 than just live streaming, more than just voiceover. Like we're gonna talk about 19 00:01:08.239 --> 00:01:11.560 the business of your voice. I should have named that the title of the 20 00:01:11.599 --> 00:01:15.079 show, but before I do, everyone always asked me about this microphone. 21 00:01:15.519 --> 00:01:19.319 This is a sure M v seven and his limited edition. So it's a 22 00:01:19.319 --> 00:01:25.760 white new air and you can go to Billy Thorpe dot live and excuse me, 23 00:01:25.760 --> 00:01:27.319 I'll clear my throat there and check it out. So you can go 24 00:01:27.359 --> 00:01:30.719 there. It's a limited edition. You can pre order now and they will 25 00:01:30.719 --> 00:01:34.519 ship it out on the fifteen, so you get about six days until they'll 26 00:01:34.560 --> 00:01:37.599 start shipping those. So if you haven't gotten years yet and you want to 27 00:01:37.599 --> 00:01:40.200 be a part of the cool kids club, I know my guys over at 28 00:01:40.239 --> 00:01:42.840 Dil casters have one. My Buddy monty weaver has one. So we're all 29 00:01:42.879 --> 00:01:48.760 going to create this this exclusive club where we all get together and just talking 30 00:01:48.760 --> 00:01:51.400 to our microphones. And if you're not a part of it, that's on 31 00:01:51.519 --> 00:01:53.920 you. But also, if you get a billy Thorpe dot live, that 32 00:01:53.000 --> 00:01:57.560 is an affiliate link. I'll take you to my Amazon store and that is 33 00:01:57.560 --> 00:02:00.920 one way you can support the show and support me as a content creators. 34 00:02:00.920 --> 00:02:05.840 So high five for doing that and getting getting getting a microphone for you. 35 00:02:06.439 --> 00:02:09.159 Uh. So, anyway, I'm gonna cut this intro down pretty sure I 36 00:02:09.199 --> 00:02:14.159 want to get jody in here and start talking about how she has leveraged her 37 00:02:14.240 --> 00:02:16.800 voice and how she can inspire us to leverage our voice. So she has 38 00:02:16.840 --> 00:02:22.520 a UM phenomenal bio and I'm not gonna read it to you because I'm not 39 00:02:22.560 --> 00:02:24.759 really good at reading, but we'll talk through some of the things that she's 40 00:02:24.759 --> 00:02:29.680 been doing in her career for the last fifteen years. But I want you 41 00:02:29.719 --> 00:02:32.840 to share this episode, like it, save it, share it, subscribe 42 00:02:32.879 --> 00:02:37.319 to all those fun things, because she's going to drop a wealth of knowledge. 43 00:02:37.360 --> 00:02:39.719 I jumped into a lot of clubhouse rooms where she's talking about the power 44 00:02:39.840 --> 00:02:43.960 of audio, the power of voice, and she is one of the most 45 00:02:44.000 --> 00:02:49.080 passionate people in this space about these subjects. So, without further Ado, 46 00:02:49.159 --> 00:02:52.080 drum roll, somebody, anybody? Oh No, it's just me in the 47 00:02:52.120 --> 00:02:54.159 studio. All Right, here we go, jody cranel. Welcome to the 48 00:02:54.199 --> 00:02:58.960 show. How are you? I'm great. Thanks. How are you doing? 49 00:03:00.159 --> 00:03:01.479 Doing good. You know, I'm just didn't here talking to myself, 50 00:03:01.560 --> 00:03:05.719 looking at a blank wall. It's really fun, but I'm glad you're I'm 51 00:03:05.759 --> 00:03:07.879 glad you're on. Now I have somebody to talk to. I'm glad I'm 52 00:03:07.919 --> 00:03:13.759 here too. Well. Thank you so much for for being on the show. 53 00:03:13.840 --> 00:03:15.560 I'm a huge fan. Like I said, I follow you around Clubhouse, 54 00:03:15.599 --> 00:03:19.719 follow you around the Internet and see that you're doing a lot of cool 55 00:03:19.759 --> 00:03:23.840 stuff and more than just doing the work, but you're enabling other people and 56 00:03:23.919 --> 00:03:29.840 encouraging other people to jump into the space of using their voice, using your 57 00:03:29.840 --> 00:03:32.680 creativity, using their talent, all that kind of stuff. So I know 58 00:03:32.840 --> 00:03:36.800 you've been doing this for about fifteen years. I do want to hear the 59 00:03:36.800 --> 00:03:40.000 backstory of how you got into voiceover because in my opinion, it's a little 60 00:03:40.000 --> 00:03:44.000 bit intimidating, but you do such a great job, so I'm curious how 61 00:03:44.039 --> 00:03:46.759 you got into it. It can be a little intimidating, it's true. 62 00:03:47.479 --> 00:03:54.800 But actually when I first heard of voice over, it was probably six. 63 00:03:54.919 --> 00:04:01.240 I volunteered my time to read books onto tape for the blind at the Canadian 64 00:04:01.319 --> 00:04:05.879 National Institute for the blind, and that really was tape. It was real 65 00:04:05.960 --> 00:04:12.439 to real tape. So it was quite something to learn the tech as well 66 00:04:12.479 --> 00:04:15.240 as to do the voicing, and I liked them both equally as well. 67 00:04:15.319 --> 00:04:20.639 So that kind of gave me a hint that voiceover was something I might want 68 00:04:20.639 --> 00:04:25.920 to do, but it was also something that I wasn't intimidated by, so 69 00:04:26.000 --> 00:04:29.519 that was nice to know. It actually took a little bit of time, 70 00:04:29.519 --> 00:04:32.759 though, for me to manage to make it a career, because I was 71 00:04:32.839 --> 00:04:38.920 a really early adopter of the Internet. So I had a uh, songwriting 72 00:04:39.079 --> 00:04:47.759 website online called the muses muse from about until and it was around for a 73 00:04:47.759 --> 00:04:51.600 long time, long enough to get pretty big and kind of was my baby 74 00:04:51.639 --> 00:04:55.519 for a long time. And through that site I learned S E O and 75 00:04:55.600 --> 00:05:00.360 Internet marketing and that was what I was doing before I just I did to 76 00:05:00.360 --> 00:05:05.480 give voiceovers a try. And really the reason I did that was because I 77 00:05:05.480 --> 00:05:11.040 got bored, and lots of things happened for me when I get bored. 78 00:05:13.360 --> 00:05:18.639 Spoken like a true creator, Jody Creator. How Your Business? Well, 79 00:05:18.720 --> 00:05:21.360 you know what? I was just bored of everything I was doing. I 80 00:05:21.439 --> 00:05:25.399 was very successful, my music was blowing up. I was just bored. 81 00:05:26.920 --> 00:05:30.600 Yeah, it was less, it was less about I mean who honestly like 82 00:05:30.680 --> 00:05:34.600 unless you're, I don't know, latest flavor musical act of the day, 83 00:05:35.000 --> 00:05:39.720 it's really hard to make a living as a musician. So, Um, 84 00:05:39.759 --> 00:05:43.279 the songwriting end of things, I like being behind the scenes. I think 85 00:05:43.319 --> 00:05:46.120 that's kind of where the whole voiceover thing kind of took hold, because I 86 00:05:46.160 --> 00:05:49.480 like being behind the scenes. I don't want to be a film actor or 87 00:05:49.519 --> 00:05:56.120 a theater actor or anything like that. So being able to do this behind 88 00:05:56.120 --> 00:06:00.160 the scenes and use my voice, which I really enjoy doing, that kind 89 00:06:00.199 --> 00:06:03.279 of really appealed to me. And songwriting, in the same way, appealed 90 00:06:03.319 --> 00:06:06.959 to me for that reason as well, because songwriting is kind of the background 91 00:06:08.000 --> 00:06:11.319 of the musical performance, right you have a good song, then you have 92 00:06:11.360 --> 00:06:15.560 a good performance, but you're not the one who's actually out there on stage 93 00:06:15.680 --> 00:06:20.240 singing or performing all the time. So yeah, that it was interesting. 94 00:06:21.279 --> 00:06:24.680 That's a pretty cool story because, you know, I spent a lot of 95 00:06:24.720 --> 00:06:28.279 years behind the scenes as well and I honestly loved it, like I really 96 00:06:28.279 --> 00:06:30.399 did have a lot of fun. I feel like there was pressure, but 97 00:06:30.439 --> 00:06:33.199 it wasn't the same kind of pressure as like being front and center, being 98 00:06:33.279 --> 00:06:38.439 lead singer or whatever. Um. And so now that I'm kind of the 99 00:06:38.519 --> 00:06:45.839 lead singer of my band, you guys, podcast is yeah, I feel 100 00:06:45.839 --> 00:06:49.439 like there right show guys listen. Um. So, so when you're moving, 101 00:06:49.439 --> 00:06:54.079 when you're moving into it, were you like studying other people, or 102 00:06:54.120 --> 00:06:58.199 did you just start like practicing, recording your voice, listening back, like 103 00:06:58.279 --> 00:07:01.040 what does what does that look like? Because, like when I started podcasting, 104 00:07:01.199 --> 00:07:04.920 like I be, I just studied podcasting like everyone. I listen to 105 00:07:04.959 --> 00:07:09.079 every style of podcasts ever and just to try to figure that out. Is 106 00:07:09.120 --> 00:07:14.040 that the same for you? Well, I think that it can be. 107 00:07:14.480 --> 00:07:16.439 If you really want to go your own route, you can. You can 108 00:07:16.480 --> 00:07:21.399 definitely try and observe what's out there, but I think that unless you get 109 00:07:21.439 --> 00:07:27.240 actual coaching, it's really not going to help you, because you need to 110 00:07:27.279 --> 00:07:30.920 know the background of all of this. So there's a reason why there are 111 00:07:30.000 --> 00:07:35.120 certain types of voiceover reads that are popular, and it has to do with 112 00:07:35.600 --> 00:07:41.480 what's happening in the world. It has to do with Um, you know, 113 00:07:41.519 --> 00:07:46.319 like in our in our every day right now, people's B s ometers 114 00:07:46.360 --> 00:07:50.680 are so high right now, like you can't at all sound like you're selling. 115 00:07:51.319 --> 00:07:56.519 That's the thing. So if you're going to do commercials or corporate narration 116 00:07:56.639 --> 00:08:01.240 or anything like that and actually have people want to pay you for it? 117 00:08:01.240 --> 00:08:07.680 It does require acting and it does require being subtle, being real, being 118 00:08:07.720 --> 00:08:13.959 able to be enthusiastic about something without sounding like you're overdoing it, like you're 119 00:08:13.959 --> 00:08:16.639 working too hard. You know what I mean, and that is that's big. 120 00:08:18.120 --> 00:08:22.920 That's really big. Also, this is a really Um, a really 121 00:08:22.040 --> 00:08:28.920 unnatural environment to be recording where you're supposed to sound natural. Yeah, yeah, 122 00:08:28.959 --> 00:08:31.200 well, because when I share a little bit with you before the show, 123 00:08:31.240 --> 00:08:33.960 like I have a sponsor and they send us a script. You know, 124 00:08:35.000 --> 00:08:37.039 one of our sponsors doesn't, the other one send us a script and, 125 00:08:37.759 --> 00:08:41.039 Um, and I just look at the thing and I'm like, I 126 00:08:41.080 --> 00:08:43.879 don't even know how you how this, read this, like it's all in 127 00:08:43.000 --> 00:08:46.240 caps, and so I think it's like my mother texting me and I'm like, 128 00:08:46.240 --> 00:08:48.960 you know what, I'm just gonna Scream this into my microphone as loud 129 00:08:48.960 --> 00:08:52.519 as I can, like go get your mother's Day gift or whatever, you 130 00:08:52.519 --> 00:08:56.240 know, whatever it says. So when I hear someone like you and I 131 00:08:56.360 --> 00:09:00.639 and I, you know, listen to your in a US sound like you're 132 00:09:00.679 --> 00:09:03.080 just telling somebody a story or you know, you're just not even it didn't 133 00:09:03.080 --> 00:09:07.360 sound like you're reading at all. And and I'm over here like stuttering, 134 00:09:07.440 --> 00:09:11.240 like reading my notes off, and I can record like fifty times to get 135 00:09:11.279 --> 00:09:15.440 this thirty second piece that I really wanted to be fifteen seconds, but it 136 00:09:15.600 --> 00:09:18.679 is not gonna happen. Um. So that's pretty interesting. So so step 137 00:09:18.799 --> 00:09:20.879 one, if I was going to get into voice, and we'll just use 138 00:09:20.960 --> 00:09:24.919 me as an example, or someone watching. And we got, by the 139 00:09:24.960 --> 00:09:28.519 way, we got some fans of yours. We get Rothfield in the house, 140 00:09:31.840 --> 00:09:33.840 we got Jim, Jim Fuse in the house. Is Hey Joe, 141 00:09:35.240 --> 00:09:39.480 and we had Chris in the house. And UH, yeah, she it 142 00:09:39.639 --> 00:09:43.720 is the voice. It's the voice of many. You know, I listened 143 00:09:43.759 --> 00:09:46.320 to a podcast, Um the UH, Oh gosh, I'm gonna say the 144 00:09:46.360 --> 00:09:50.559 wrong podcast, podfast. I listened to that podcast. So I get to 145 00:09:50.600 --> 00:09:54.759 listen to the voice every week with the with the intro or whatever the frequency 146 00:09:54.759 --> 00:09:58.519 of their show is. Um. So, so step one, billy, 147 00:09:58.639 --> 00:10:01.120 you want to become a voice actor, go get from coaching. Is that 148 00:10:01.159 --> 00:10:05.320 what you would say? Definitely. What do I mean? Obviously I know 149 00:10:05.399 --> 00:10:07.039 you're on the show so I can bring you up. I know you do 150 00:10:07.159 --> 00:10:11.600 that, but if I don't know anyone, like where would I go? 151 00:10:11.720 --> 00:10:13.399 Where would I go like find two or three and vet down? Or how 152 00:10:13.399 --> 00:10:16.399 do I vet nowm like, what does that even look like? You know, 153 00:10:16.480 --> 00:10:22.080 there's a website called voice over extra dot com and it's voice over x 154 00:10:22.159 --> 00:10:28.320 t r a dot com and I highly recommend that website. The reason I 155 00:10:28.360 --> 00:10:33.879 do is because it has all a lot of the well known coaches do articles 156 00:10:33.919 --> 00:10:37.240 and write articles for the website, and so you'll see that there are offering 157 00:10:37.320 --> 00:10:41.000 classes. Some of them are group classes. So what you could do is, 158 00:10:41.159 --> 00:10:43.960 rather than do a one on one which can be expensive. You know, 159 00:10:45.039 --> 00:10:48.759 you're talking anywhere from let's say eighty bucks an hour to two hundred, 160 00:10:48.799 --> 00:10:52.240 two hundred and fifty bucks an hour, depending on the coach, so that 161 00:10:52.279 --> 00:10:56.720 could be very expensive for people starting off. If you want to do a 162 00:10:56.759 --> 00:11:01.039 group thing, though, that's probably like fifty buck us. You get to 163 00:11:01.080 --> 00:11:03.919 read for that person. You may be reading with other people, maybe eight 164 00:11:03.919 --> 00:11:09.000 to ten other people, so it keeps the cost down for you and everyone 165 00:11:09.039 --> 00:11:11.799 and you can watch it later on, because usually they'll record it and you 166 00:11:11.840 --> 00:11:16.039 can try out different genres. So you may want to do commercially. You 167 00:11:16.080 --> 00:11:20.960 may also want to do video games. You may also want to do animation, 168 00:11:20.120 --> 00:11:24.440 you may want to do audio books, you may want to do medical 169 00:11:24.519 --> 00:11:28.080 narration. You know, if you happen to have a background in medical and 170 00:11:28.120 --> 00:11:31.600 you can say all those words really easily, you've kind of got it made, 171 00:11:31.720 --> 00:11:33.679 you know. So you just blew my mind there a little bit. 172 00:11:33.720 --> 00:11:37.639 I did not realize that there's different in which I should because there's different genres 173 00:11:37.639 --> 00:11:41.159 of music, of podcasts, of live streams, all that kind of fun 174 00:11:41.159 --> 00:11:45.279 stuff. But I did not realize there's different genres of voice acting. And 175 00:11:45.320 --> 00:11:48.600 that makes sense because you know, and I heard you do a medical ad 176 00:11:48.600 --> 00:11:50.559 not too long ago. I was watching your your highlight reel there, and 177 00:11:50.600 --> 00:11:54.879 I was like yeah, I even I had that very same thought, jody. 178 00:11:54.919 --> 00:11:56.679 I was like, how in the world does she know those words like 179 00:11:56.720 --> 00:12:01.480 that? Is such crazy words to be you sing. But that's something to 180 00:12:01.600 --> 00:12:05.000 take into consideration, I guess, if I'm trying to get into it to 181 00:12:05.559 --> 00:12:07.480 be where I can pronounce it well, you know what. So maybe I 182 00:12:07.480 --> 00:12:11.159 could do the Alphabet Book for children, because I know I can do that. 183 00:12:11.159 --> 00:12:16.960 That's it. You know, you don't necessarily need to do medical narration. 184 00:12:18.080 --> 00:12:20.519 Honestly, I don't do a whole lot of it. I do a 185 00:12:20.559 --> 00:12:24.799 lot of healthcare ads, I do a lot of healthcare narrations, but I 186 00:12:24.919 --> 00:12:31.279 don't tend to do the heavy medical terms, those sorts of things. Not 187 00:12:31.519 --> 00:12:35.039 Usually. So every once in a while, you know, things like Kiscali, 188 00:12:35.159 --> 00:12:39.039 I think, is what you're hearing. Every once in a while that 189 00:12:39.039 --> 00:12:41.440 that will come up and you know I'll do something like that, but it's 190 00:12:41.559 --> 00:12:46.360 it's it's rare for me. But I do tend to do mostly Um commercials 191 00:12:46.559 --> 00:12:52.799 and corporate narrations. So a lot of the anthem videos on big company websites 192 00:12:52.840 --> 00:12:54.799 that you see like the you know, this is who we are and we're 193 00:12:54.840 --> 00:13:01.360 proud those types of videos that you see on on company websites. And Uh, 194 00:13:01.480 --> 00:13:05.759 I love doing tourism and travel stuff, so lately I've been doing a 195 00:13:05.759 --> 00:13:09.440 lot of that. There's actually something out there right now for visit Alberta. 196 00:13:11.879 --> 00:13:16.080 So yeah, they're there. Are A lot of fun. It's just that 197 00:13:16.159 --> 00:13:22.399 whole anthem idea, that whole um getting people as excited about something as as 198 00:13:22.440 --> 00:13:26.639 they are. You know, yeah, that's only people. Yeah, and 199 00:13:26.639 --> 00:13:30.720 that's like a tough that's a tough thing to do, I feel like because, 200 00:13:31.080 --> 00:13:33.360 like I said, I'm just reading, I mean my voice over work. 201 00:13:33.440 --> 00:13:37.519 I'll quote air quotes for people listening. Is literally reading a script that 202 00:13:37.720 --> 00:13:43.039 someone that brand sent me for my show. And I want to crush you, 203 00:13:43.200 --> 00:13:45.679 I want to do a great job, but I really just don't understand 204 00:13:45.720 --> 00:13:48.399 it. So that that would probably be, you know, like you said, 205 00:13:48.399 --> 00:13:50.360 step on one, go get some coaching, maybe the group, maybe 206 00:13:50.360 --> 00:13:56.080 the one on one Um. So is there like I'm sure there's some people, 207 00:13:56.080 --> 00:13:58.759 you know, there's some people that can just sing and then there's me, 208 00:13:58.000 --> 00:14:01.840 like I can't. So like, well, at what point do you 209 00:14:03.279 --> 00:14:05.879 do people just tell you, like are there good coaches that will just say, 210 00:14:05.879 --> 00:14:07.120 you know what, this isn't for you, maybe you should be a 211 00:14:07.120 --> 00:14:11.720 hand model, like what does that look like? You know, I it 212 00:14:11.799 --> 00:14:15.440 depends on the coach. But yeah, there are a lot of coaches out 213 00:14:15.480 --> 00:14:20.320 there who are very good about telling you whether or not you should be pursuing 214 00:14:20.360 --> 00:14:24.440 this. But but you know, at the same time, I don't think 215 00:14:24.480 --> 00:14:28.600 they're likely to tell you that, unless maybe you have a speech impediment or 216 00:14:28.039 --> 00:14:31.879 you have a problem reading the scripts maybe, and you just need to get 217 00:14:31.879 --> 00:14:37.600 better at reading them. Um, sounding like you're not reading is another another 218 00:14:37.679 --> 00:14:43.159 thing. That really means that you kind of need to read fairly quickly and 219 00:14:43.200 --> 00:14:48.159 be a little ahead in the script. So if if you're not, you 220 00:14:48.200 --> 00:14:52.120 know, if you're not used to reading out loud to somebody, it could 221 00:14:52.279 --> 00:14:56.480 become difficult for you. That makes sense. So I should have probably raised 222 00:14:56.480 --> 00:14:58.519 my hand more in fifth grade and said, you know what I mean, 223 00:15:00.080 --> 00:15:03.000 do it. I'm sorry, Miss Bettis, I know you told me I 224 00:15:03.279 --> 00:15:07.559 should have raised my hand more. You will always find it useful, all 225 00:15:07.639 --> 00:15:11.720 right. So, alright, so I love this that you're kind of breaking 226 00:15:11.720 --> 00:15:15.120 down for us how to get into this business because, you know, I 227 00:15:15.159 --> 00:15:16.440 feel like there's probably a lot of podcasts. Actually, I know there's a 228 00:15:16.440 --> 00:15:20.360 lot of podcasters. I listened to that. I just listened to their voice 229 00:15:20.360 --> 00:15:24.080 and go wow, that is they could just read me a book or put 230 00:15:24.080 --> 00:15:28.720 me to sleep or wake me up or whatever. Um, and they might 231 00:15:28.799 --> 00:15:33.279 be missing out on an opportunity for a career, you know, similar to 232 00:15:33.279 --> 00:15:37.840 you, or additional income or something of that nature. So once, once 233 00:15:37.919 --> 00:15:41.159 you get into the game, and maybe you're doing some coaching or getting coached 234 00:15:41.200 --> 00:15:43.799 and your coach looks at you and goes, all right, it's time to 235 00:15:43.840 --> 00:15:48.519 go get a job. Where do I go to get a job? Where 236 00:15:48.559 --> 00:15:52.120 I go? Look now? Well, likely what they're going to tell you, 237 00:15:52.159 --> 00:15:54.879 before they tell you to go get a job, although you might be 238 00:15:54.919 --> 00:16:00.000 able to, is to get a demo. Because, yeah, you skipped 239 00:16:00.039 --> 00:16:03.840 his death exactly. So Demos are your calling cards, you know, like 240 00:16:03.879 --> 00:16:07.440 the video that you saw that I put together, and that is another calling 241 00:16:07.480 --> 00:16:11.480 card that happens to be of work that I'd actually done. But in the 242 00:16:11.519 --> 00:16:18.000 case of a demo it's manufactured. So the idea behind a demo in a 243 00:16:18.039 --> 00:16:21.120 lot of cases, not in all cases, but in a lot of cases, 244 00:16:21.200 --> 00:16:23.440 it is to showcase your voice to the best of your ability and to 245 00:16:23.519 --> 00:16:29.120 the best of your producer's ability. So sometimes when you do a spot, 246 00:16:29.799 --> 00:16:34.159 your voice isn't really front and center all the time and they may have processed 247 00:16:34.200 --> 00:16:37.240 it in a strange way. It made the it made the client happy, 248 00:16:37.279 --> 00:16:41.600 and that, ultimately, is the bottom line, right, that's really what's 249 00:16:41.600 --> 00:16:45.720 important. But it may not be something you want to use to showcase how 250 00:16:45.759 --> 00:16:48.600 good you are at your job. Do you know what I mean? So 251 00:16:48.639 --> 00:16:52.799 you want to put together like this is the this is the a package, 252 00:16:52.799 --> 00:16:55.720 like, I'm gonna do my best, I'm going to put it yeah, 253 00:16:55.759 --> 00:16:59.759 yeah, that makes sense. Yeah, so they manufacture these, right. 254 00:16:59.799 --> 00:17:03.559 So, so what they'll do is they will create a script. A demo 255 00:17:03.640 --> 00:17:07.119 producer will create a script for you. They'll talk with you beforehand, find 256 00:17:07.119 --> 00:17:11.599 out what you're impassioned about, what you're interested in, what your background is, 257 00:17:12.359 --> 00:17:18.279 and they'll craft scripts for you that will um hit you deeply enough that 258 00:17:18.359 --> 00:17:23.599 you you're your passion for it will come through when you're performing that script. 259 00:17:25.079 --> 00:17:29.519 And then they will do a session with you, record your voice and then 260 00:17:29.519 --> 00:17:34.640 they'll produce it all and put it all together as a bunch of segments from 261 00:17:34.880 --> 00:17:40.279 different commercials, let's say, if you're doing a commercial demo or different pieces 262 00:17:40.279 --> 00:17:45.720 of a narration. If you're doing a narration demo and like Documentary Work and 263 00:17:45.880 --> 00:17:51.559 TV inshow narration work is different from corporate narration. You know they're they're different 264 00:17:51.599 --> 00:17:56.240 genres really. So you know that. Again, scripts are different, deliveries 265 00:17:56.319 --> 00:18:00.759 might be different. There's all sorts of things to think about in this. 266 00:18:02.359 --> 00:18:08.000 But having that demo on your website and having a website to showcase those demos 267 00:18:08.559 --> 00:18:11.880 is going to let people know that you are a professional, that you know 268 00:18:11.920 --> 00:18:15.279 what you're doing, and this is how you would sound on, let's say, 269 00:18:15.319 --> 00:18:19.799 a national campaign, or this is how you would sound on a big 270 00:18:19.839 --> 00:18:26.440 company's website, you know, and you can sort of demonstrate that and show 271 00:18:26.480 --> 00:18:30.720 people how you might be able to make them shine. So so I love 272 00:18:30.839 --> 00:18:34.160 kind of what you said there about, you know, these different genres, 273 00:18:34.200 --> 00:18:37.839 because I feel like you could generate multiple, I'm not gonna say personalities, 274 00:18:37.880 --> 00:18:42.799 but multiple streams of revenue, multiple different industries and putting together, like, 275 00:18:42.799 --> 00:18:47.920 like you said, certain type of narrations in those different demos. So how 276 00:18:47.960 --> 00:18:51.279 often are you, or actually, how many different types of demos do you 277 00:18:51.359 --> 00:18:55.119 have? You have one for each niche or one for each genre? Yeah, 278 00:18:55.279 --> 00:19:00.759 mostly I do. Actually, I think I have probably at least six, 279 00:19:00.839 --> 00:19:03.839 maybe seven or eight on my website right now. Um, but I 280 00:19:03.839 --> 00:19:07.880 mean this is over fifteen years right. They're not. They've been updated, 281 00:19:08.359 --> 00:19:12.279 but as I go through the years I find that I want to do certain 282 00:19:12.319 --> 00:19:15.839 genres more than others. So I've gotten rid of some, I've added some 283 00:19:15.960 --> 00:19:21.160 others. Um, you know. There I, for instance, have a 284 00:19:21.200 --> 00:19:25.519 policy right now where I don't do long form narration. So I no longer 285 00:19:25.640 --> 00:19:30.920 do e learning or long medical narration or audio books or anything like that. 286 00:19:30.960 --> 00:19:36.200 I've never done audio books. I don't want to do audiobooks. That is 287 00:19:36.240 --> 00:19:38.480 not something I want to do. But I have a policy where I don't 288 00:19:38.519 --> 00:19:45.319 do projects generally that are more than five minutes of finished audio. So a 289 00:19:45.400 --> 00:19:52.359 five minute script up to five minutes is usually a commercial or corporate narration or 290 00:19:52.480 --> 00:19:57.160 something for a website, like an explainer or a streaming ad or you know 291 00:19:57.240 --> 00:20:00.839 that kind of stuff. They're they're fairly short. I can get them done 292 00:20:00.920 --> 00:20:07.000 very quickly and the client has what they need in like an hour, so 293 00:20:07.160 --> 00:20:11.880 we're all good. So that yeah, so when you're producing the well, 294 00:20:11.920 --> 00:20:15.279 when you are doing your part of the equation, I'm sure there's way more 295 00:20:15.319 --> 00:20:18.440 than my brain is thinking about. So we're just delivering raw files. So 296 00:20:18.480 --> 00:20:21.519 if someone called you and said Hey, I need you to do this and 297 00:20:21.640 --> 00:20:25.599 you deliver it, they send it to another producer and they produced the final 298 00:20:25.720 --> 00:20:27.720 version of it. Exactly. Yeah, so all I do is get them 299 00:20:27.720 --> 00:20:33.000 the raw voice in a clean format, so there's nothing that they have to 300 00:20:33.079 --> 00:20:37.519 do to it, unless it's to fit whatever video they're putting together. Um, 301 00:20:37.559 --> 00:20:41.200 and then I leave the production to them because really they have their own 302 00:20:41.240 --> 00:20:44.240 way of doing things. But the sooner I can get that to them, 303 00:20:44.240 --> 00:20:47.359 the sooner they can get their project done, and I don't want to be 304 00:20:47.400 --> 00:20:51.680 the one cog that's holding everything up. Yeah, so, and I say, 305 00:20:51.720 --> 00:20:55.079 after fifteen years, you could probably riddle out some of these in a 306 00:20:55.200 --> 00:21:00.480 day. So so in like right know, what's happening with me is like 307 00:21:00.559 --> 00:21:03.680 the reason that I did that whole no longer than five minutes, is because 308 00:21:03.720 --> 00:21:07.960 I can do just about anything in probably an hour that I'm likely to get 309 00:21:07.960 --> 00:21:11.799 in a day, and that means there are no fires to put out. 310 00:21:11.319 --> 00:21:18.319 That that just makes my life much, much less stressful. That's that's amazing. 311 00:21:18.440 --> 00:21:22.279 That's an amazing stream of revenue to be able to uh, you know, 312 00:21:22.359 --> 00:21:25.440 obviously burning churn for a better term, you know, for a better 313 00:21:25.559 --> 00:21:29.559 term, but it's kind of like, you know, to be maximize your 314 00:21:29.599 --> 00:21:33.240 time, maximizing your voice, and I love that. I mean, I 315 00:21:33.319 --> 00:21:36.200 think that is so and that's my style anyway of like trying to produce, 316 00:21:36.920 --> 00:21:38.839 you know, I mean not saying like taking the quality out, but produced, 317 00:21:40.039 --> 00:21:41.279 you know, maximum like I only have a certain amount of days, 318 00:21:41.359 --> 00:21:45.559 like or hours, like I'm working a day, and so those hours I'm 319 00:21:45.640 --> 00:21:48.839 trying to fill up every minute to make sure I'm the most productive. So 320 00:21:48.960 --> 00:21:52.759 that's cool that this industry allows you to do that and maximize your your time 321 00:21:52.799 --> 00:21:56.680 there. It's pretty cool. I will say one thing, and that is 322 00:21:56.759 --> 00:22:03.000 that most voice actors do sell their time for money. So it's not generally 323 00:22:03.079 --> 00:22:07.400 how long it takes you to do it's kind of licensing, like music licensing 324 00:22:07.519 --> 00:22:11.680 for an ad. So someone is using my voice for a certain amount of 325 00:22:11.759 --> 00:22:17.680 time in a certain geographical location. Um, so it could be local in 326 00:22:17.759 --> 00:22:21.559 a certain area, could be regional in a larger area, it could be 327 00:22:21.720 --> 00:22:25.640 national, so all over the US or all over Canada, or it could 328 00:22:25.680 --> 00:22:30.839 be worldwide. So when I know how long they're going to use it and 329 00:22:30.039 --> 00:22:33.480 how many people are going to hear it, that's how I come up with 330 00:22:33.640 --> 00:22:38.200 the pricing. Okay, my mind is where's that Emadi where the head explodes, 331 00:22:38.200 --> 00:22:41.559 because that's what I am right now, like yes, that I needed 332 00:22:41.599 --> 00:22:45.680 to pop up all over my head. So so you're kind of sell. 333 00:22:45.839 --> 00:22:48.359 Is it like is it cold, like a CPM rate? Is that kind 334 00:22:48.359 --> 00:22:52.799 of this is not really it has the same idea, but it's not really 335 00:22:52.880 --> 00:22:56.240 a CPM rate. Um, there's something called the G V A, a 336 00:22:56.720 --> 00:23:00.880 rate guide, and if you if anyone wants to check that out, you 337 00:23:00.960 --> 00:23:07.119 can see what the industry standard rates are for a voiceover. And it goes 338 00:23:07.319 --> 00:23:14.799 from you know, television radio, streaming audio on like Um, Sirius Xm 339 00:23:14.880 --> 00:23:21.599 or Pandora or my heart, or pre rolls on Youtube or just being on 340 00:23:21.720 --> 00:23:26.160 the company website, which is non broadcast. Um, possibly use in social 341 00:23:26.279 --> 00:23:32.039 media. So not paid. But you know, the minute that something is 342 00:23:32.160 --> 00:23:37.559 being paid to be pushed out there, that's telling me that they want to 343 00:23:37.599 --> 00:23:40.960 make money from it. And if they're there to make money from it, 344 00:23:41.319 --> 00:23:45.759 then that's licensing. That's, you know, me asking them for a piece 345 00:23:45.839 --> 00:23:48.880 of that Pie. I love this. I think this is great because I 346 00:23:48.960 --> 00:23:52.960 did not know that. I thought it was, you know, more of 347 00:23:52.079 --> 00:23:56.240 that one off, you know, project price or hourly or minute, you 348 00:23:56.279 --> 00:24:00.480 know, seconds or whatever. Um, this is my project. Great. 349 00:24:00.559 --> 00:24:03.960 Yeah, yeah, by project it certainly can be a one off. I 350 00:24:04.039 --> 00:24:07.200 mean non broadcast, as I was saying. Um, you know, when 351 00:24:07.240 --> 00:24:11.680 you're talking about things that go on a website or go in social media and 352 00:24:11.759 --> 00:24:15.440 are not paid to be promoted further. Um, that is non broadcast. 353 00:24:15.559 --> 00:24:19.519 Usually there's a buyout for it. It just sits on a website for however 354 00:24:19.640 --> 00:24:22.240 long they want to use it, and that is usually a one off, 355 00:24:22.359 --> 00:24:30.680 like per project rate. But when you're talking about broadcast and advertising and streaming 356 00:24:30.759 --> 00:24:33.799 media and all of that kind of thing, then it gets a little more 357 00:24:33.839 --> 00:24:37.559 complicated. Yeah, this is why you need to hire a coach. If 358 00:24:37.599 --> 00:24:41.039 you're interested in going to walk you through it. Hold your hand. Well, 359 00:24:41.079 --> 00:24:44.880 I am not a coach, just to let people know. I'm not 360 00:24:45.000 --> 00:24:48.720 a coach. I do not do coaching, but I can point them in 361 00:24:48.000 --> 00:24:52.160 a good direction if I know what their what their gold are. Ye, 362 00:24:52.400 --> 00:24:56.000 follow her on clubhouse. She does quite a bit of coaching in there and 363 00:24:56.119 --> 00:24:57.920 helps a lot of people. So make sure, if you're not on club 364 00:24:57.960 --> 00:25:00.640 house, be sure to follow her follow her podcast as well. I'm just 365 00:25:00.680 --> 00:25:04.720 go ahead and promote all that while we're here. So so this is amazing 366 00:25:04.759 --> 00:25:08.319 and I'm sorry. You know, I know you probably answer these questions every 367 00:25:08.400 --> 00:25:11.839 day, all day long, from people, but I'm like such a novice. 368 00:25:11.920 --> 00:25:15.160 I'm like, this is so cool, because I do use my voice 369 00:25:15.200 --> 00:25:18.920 to make money. I do use my voice to create, and so this 370 00:25:18.079 --> 00:25:22.559 is another way of doing that. Um. However, it is just another 371 00:25:23.079 --> 00:25:27.440 business to learn a business, to study a business, to a craft to 372 00:25:27.960 --> 00:25:32.480 become good at so I love that you're breaking this down and giving us the 373 00:25:32.599 --> 00:25:33.799 real look at it, because it's really easy to say, yeah, you 374 00:25:33.839 --> 00:25:37.920 should start voice over and you should be a voice actor. It's so easy 375 00:25:37.039 --> 00:25:41.240 and you can make lots of money, Um, but you're giving us the 376 00:25:41.519 --> 00:25:44.720 real role experience here, so I love it. So so we go, 377 00:25:45.000 --> 00:25:48.640 we get a coach. Coach says cool, go make a demo real. 378 00:25:48.920 --> 00:25:52.000 We make a demo real. Now what is our next step of this? 379 00:25:52.519 --> 00:25:53.720 What do we do with this demo real? Do we start cold calling and 380 00:25:53.880 --> 00:25:57.599 cold email and dropping dropbox files? What do we do? You know, 381 00:25:59.240 --> 00:26:03.640 you probably could if you had some information. Linkedin is a really good place 382 00:26:03.720 --> 00:26:07.279 to look for people who are specifically in the genre that you want to be 383 00:26:07.440 --> 00:26:11.599 promoting yourself, because that is a business network and people are assuming that if 384 00:26:11.599 --> 00:26:15.799 you contact them, you are a business. Um, definitely have a website. 385 00:26:17.240 --> 00:26:19.519 You need a website to have those demos living on and you need to 386 00:26:19.640 --> 00:26:22.640 have some kind of indication of what kind of a person you are, because 387 00:26:23.079 --> 00:26:26.519 people work with people they know, like and trust. Right. So you 388 00:26:26.640 --> 00:26:30.839 have to have an opportunity to give people a place where they can get to 389 00:26:30.920 --> 00:26:36.039 know you a little. And once you've figured that out, then I mean 390 00:26:36.279 --> 00:26:38.160 you know you can. You start small. You start where, you start, 391 00:26:38.200 --> 00:26:41.559 where you live. You know, start talking to local businesses, start 392 00:26:41.640 --> 00:26:45.799 talking to everybody you know in your life. Who who? Just tell them 393 00:26:45.839 --> 00:26:48.559 what you're doing. I'm doing voice over. You know, if you happen 394 00:26:48.559 --> 00:26:52.319 to know anyone, you know, you can go to my website, have 395 00:26:52.400 --> 00:26:56.440 a listen and and look at what I'm doing and uh yeah, and it's 396 00:26:56.480 --> 00:27:00.839 amazing how many people you can reach in just that way. But if you 397 00:27:00.039 --> 00:27:03.480 offer, let's say, Um, to do a voiceover for like a local 398 00:27:03.559 --> 00:27:08.319 charity or something like that, and you may not charge anything that time, 399 00:27:08.640 --> 00:27:11.960 but you know, you may charge a little bit or they may give you 400 00:27:12.039 --> 00:27:17.480 an honorarium or something like that, and you can get in with them. 401 00:27:18.079 --> 00:27:22.599 Um, maybe the local chapter uses you for something and then the national chapter 402 00:27:22.839 --> 00:27:26.680 comes and ask you for something. You know you don't know. So that's 403 00:27:26.720 --> 00:27:30.119 good advice. Yeah, and I love it because that is small business advice. 404 00:27:30.240 --> 00:27:33.799 Like if anybody's listening to this and you're like, because this is a 405 00:27:33.839 --> 00:27:36.839 small business and I love it that you know, and I know that you 406 00:27:36.920 --> 00:27:40.519 have a lot of talking points about being a small business owner and being a 407 00:27:40.559 --> 00:27:45.240 solo preneurs and everything you're saying is every way I've ever done a small business 408 00:27:45.519 --> 00:27:49.079 is to go with the people you know, that know you and and to 409 00:27:49.119 --> 00:27:52.599 start telling people and you'll be amazed at how they'll support you. And I 410 00:27:52.680 --> 00:27:56.759 think that's the key to it. And when you give, like you said, 411 00:27:56.799 --> 00:28:00.279 like go find a nonprofit, go find a charitable organization, to find 412 00:28:00.319 --> 00:28:03.799 somebody who another small business and just like do them a solid and they're going 413 00:28:03.880 --> 00:28:08.359 to be your biggest promoter, especially when that voiceover comes out or that that 414 00:28:08.440 --> 00:28:14.359 work it comes out. So yeah, there's something I want to qualify, 415 00:28:14.519 --> 00:28:18.160 though, with that, and that is that the industry rates are on that 416 00:28:18.319 --> 00:28:22.680 G V A, a rate guide. So if you look for that on 417 00:28:22.799 --> 00:28:26.079 the Internet you find it really easy. Those are the general industry rates and 418 00:28:26.160 --> 00:28:30.039 there's a range, so there's a load to a high, and what I 419 00:28:30.079 --> 00:28:34.000 would say is, if you're going to give away your work, do it 420 00:28:34.160 --> 00:28:38.079 for something you're passionate about. Don't just give away your work because you don't 421 00:28:38.160 --> 00:28:44.240 think you have enough experience, because any voice actor who's shunning who has put 422 00:28:44.279 --> 00:28:48.119 out their shingle and said they are a professional voice actor and that's what they're 423 00:28:48.160 --> 00:28:52.759 doing, should not be giving it away for free. Oh, I love 424 00:28:52.839 --> 00:28:56.480 it, I love it. This is great. This is this is great. 425 00:28:56.720 --> 00:29:00.720 Um, that's a good reminder for me to even as a podcast or 426 00:29:00.960 --> 00:29:03.559 in you know, trying to do people solids and do people favors and help 427 00:29:03.640 --> 00:29:07.319 them promote their business. Um, and I just I just brought that website 428 00:29:07.319 --> 00:29:11.599 because I'm like, I'm interested to see what it is. Yeah, so 429 00:29:11.880 --> 00:29:14.400 and and maybe even do it, especially like a nonprofit. I know I've 430 00:29:14.440 --> 00:29:17.039 done stuff for nonprofits and they'll go hey, we'll provide you a tax, 431 00:29:17.240 --> 00:29:22.039 you know, a tax form or whatever, because that's another yeah, there's 432 00:29:22.200 --> 00:29:26.960 nothing wrong with doing freebes for people that you really want to help out, 433 00:29:27.200 --> 00:29:32.920 or charities or nonprofits that you really want to help out. Definitely do that. 434 00:29:33.119 --> 00:29:36.799 If you're just starting out and you are very passionate about a cause and 435 00:29:36.880 --> 00:29:38.680 you want to make sure that you do everything you can to help them out, 436 00:29:40.200 --> 00:29:44.559 fantastic. But if some business comes up to you and says, Oh, 437 00:29:44.759 --> 00:29:47.559 well, you know, I need this thing and I know you just 438 00:29:47.680 --> 00:29:51.920 started like two weeks ago. Just do it to me, just do it 439 00:29:52.039 --> 00:29:55.839 for me for free, you know. No. Or do it for fifty 440 00:29:55.920 --> 00:29:59.440 bucks or five bucks or whatever, you know, like they're gonna toss your 441 00:29:59.480 --> 00:30:03.839 way right. No, I just don't do that. Yeah, yeah, 442 00:30:03.920 --> 00:30:07.319 yeah, and then that happens in so many creative fields I can't even really 443 00:30:07.440 --> 00:30:11.200 I see people all the time like hey, if you're an intern or if 444 00:30:11.279 --> 00:30:15.960 you just graduated college and you need some portfolio work, like, do work 445 00:30:17.039 --> 00:30:18.599 for me for free, and I'm like, you're not just vomit when I 446 00:30:18.680 --> 00:30:22.960 read those things on facebook. I can't believe that. And if your business 447 00:30:22.000 --> 00:30:26.599 owner, don't do that. Okay, that's no. No. For what 448 00:30:26.720 --> 00:30:30.640 it's worth, there's there's also something to be said for people who go on 449 00:30:30.839 --> 00:30:33.720 Fiver, and I you know, I want to mention this because I know 450 00:30:33.880 --> 00:30:37.960 that some sometimes going to fiber is your only option, and I understand that. 451 00:30:37.480 --> 00:30:41.119 But if you are a professional and you are asking for professional rates, 452 00:30:41.680 --> 00:30:48.759 don't go to fiber, because that's basically being a hypocrite. So are people 453 00:30:48.880 --> 00:30:52.400 on five or not? Because I was listening to a podcast the other day 454 00:30:52.480 --> 00:30:57.640 in a different industry and this lady started out kind of doing the five dollar 455 00:30:57.759 --> 00:31:00.319 thing and then all of a sudden she was like, yeah, I'm just 456 00:31:00.519 --> 00:31:06.359 charging normal rates, but the customer bases like ginormous there, and so she's 457 00:31:06.599 --> 00:31:08.799 now they do take a big, hefty fee. So yeah, and it 458 00:31:08.880 --> 00:31:14.680 takes a lot of work to make a good living there. Yeah, maybe 459 00:31:14.720 --> 00:31:18.559 that's not as lucrative as that podcast episode made it out to me. I 460 00:31:18.720 --> 00:31:22.400 always wonder. I have to wonder, and I'm not saying you can't make 461 00:31:22.480 --> 00:31:26.599 money on there. You totally can, and you can charge rates that you 462 00:31:26.759 --> 00:31:30.799 think are reasonable. But when I look at the people who are on five, 463 00:31:32.960 --> 00:31:37.880 at least in the voice acting area, you know, yeah, you 464 00:31:37.000 --> 00:31:41.119 can't charge what you think are the going rates, but what they think are 465 00:31:41.200 --> 00:31:47.359 the going rates are actually probably less than the going rates. Do you know 466 00:31:47.400 --> 00:31:51.160 what I mean? Like, like there's there's a lot going on there. 467 00:31:51.279 --> 00:31:53.440 There's a lot to unpack. I'm not gonna like Poo Poo all over people 468 00:31:53.440 --> 00:31:57.279 who go to fiber and who are on fiber. It's just like it's it's 469 00:31:57.279 --> 00:32:01.599 a marketplace like any other. But all I'm saying is, if you expect 470 00:32:01.680 --> 00:32:07.079 to be paid fair market rates for what you are doing creatively. Hey, 471 00:32:07.240 --> 00:32:13.359 fame, fair market rates to other people doing creative things. where, where 472 00:32:13.519 --> 00:32:16.799 is the handclap button over here? My God, I love it, you 473 00:32:16.880 --> 00:32:21.519 know, and I think that is so important for people to really and other 474 00:32:21.640 --> 00:32:23.799 creators as well. You know, this is the thing that I try to 475 00:32:23.839 --> 00:32:28.960 tell content creators and podcasters, live streamers. It's if you see it, 476 00:32:29.039 --> 00:32:30.839 buy me a coffee, pop up, buy someone a coffee like that, 477 00:32:31.000 --> 00:32:35.720 because it's building that culture within the industry to say hey, this is what 478 00:32:35.839 --> 00:32:38.279 people do, like we go buy coffees and then that creator goes, Oh, 479 00:32:38.319 --> 00:32:40.519 I want to give a shout out to to jody for buying me a 480 00:32:40.599 --> 00:32:44.599 coffee. Then, Oh, somebody bought your coffee, I'M gonna go buy 481 00:32:44.640 --> 00:32:47.799 a coffee too, and so it creates this momentum in the industry to to 482 00:32:47.960 --> 00:32:51.839 really help people out, and so I love that you mentioned that, like 483 00:32:52.039 --> 00:32:54.599 pay the rate, pay the fair market rate to get the job done. 484 00:32:55.119 --> 00:32:59.680 In that way we can up level the whole industry and I love that. 485 00:32:59.799 --> 00:33:02.519 Like you can tell my small bit my my love of small business is kind 486 00:33:02.519 --> 00:33:06.920 of dripping out here, but I love I love Love, love that talking 487 00:33:07.079 --> 00:33:10.519 point. Yes, we are. We are all small businesses. I mean 488 00:33:13.079 --> 00:33:15.839 especially those of us who are doing creative things as a solo preneurs. You 489 00:33:15.880 --> 00:33:21.559 know, that's and that's that's important. It's important for people to understand that, 490 00:33:21.720 --> 00:33:24.160 even though you can't hold this product in your hand, it is something 491 00:33:24.240 --> 00:33:31.119 worth paying for. Yeah, well, it's like to realize all these things 492 00:33:31.200 --> 00:33:36.200 that we're doing, that we're doing every day to get better at even you 493 00:33:36.240 --> 00:33:39.000 know this, this episode, this podcast episode, this livestream show, it 494 00:33:39.160 --> 00:33:43.839 didn't happen overnight, like it's taken lots and lots of work to figure out 495 00:33:44.000 --> 00:33:46.480 this skill and this craft and, Um, and I think for people getting 496 00:33:46.519 --> 00:33:51.039 into it, just like anything, it's like treat it as a craft and 497 00:33:51.279 --> 00:33:54.119 learn the craft, just like if you were going to become a doctor or 498 00:33:54.160 --> 00:33:57.599 a lawyer. You know. So I think so many times, like we 499 00:33:57.720 --> 00:34:00.920 put the stamp of like, you know, awesome on a doctor than like 500 00:34:00.039 --> 00:34:04.000 the stamp of like okay, whatever, on a creator and it's just like, 501 00:34:04.720 --> 00:34:07.279 I'm like, what are you talking about? It's just as hard, 502 00:34:07.359 --> 00:34:09.920 like it's just as complicated. Sure, if I mess up my skill, 503 00:34:10.039 --> 00:34:15.280 I don't kill somebody. That's I give that to you, but otherwise it's 504 00:34:15.280 --> 00:34:19.280 still pretty hard to to make it as a creator in this world and and 505 00:34:19.440 --> 00:34:22.320 do that kind of stuff. So so, Jodie, first of all, 506 00:34:22.400 --> 00:34:25.000 I appreciate you coming on the show. I appreciate you dropping all this knowledge 507 00:34:25.599 --> 00:34:30.719 and I don't know where I was in the process of getting work. But 508 00:34:30.840 --> 00:34:35.280 if there's there's anything that you wanted to to leave us with or encourage the 509 00:34:35.360 --> 00:34:37.280 audience with if they're looking to get into this, I'd love to give you 510 00:34:37.280 --> 00:34:40.320 a few minutes just to you know, share, share some more of your 511 00:34:40.400 --> 00:34:45.000 knowledge and I want to encourage people to connect with you as well and just 512 00:34:45.199 --> 00:34:47.760 really follow you, because I think success leaves clues and there's a lot of 513 00:34:47.800 --> 00:34:51.599 clues that that you leave and and a lot of that you give to the 514 00:34:51.679 --> 00:34:55.639 world of voice actors and podcasters and live streamers stuff. If there's something you 515 00:34:55.679 --> 00:35:00.400 want to share about it kind of the end of the process, you would 516 00:35:00.400 --> 00:35:06.639 love to uh yeah, I mean we were talking about how to find the 517 00:35:06.679 --> 00:35:10.360 work, which, Um, that's a good option to go locally and figure 518 00:35:10.440 --> 00:35:15.760 that out and tell everybody that you know that that's what you're doing and you 519 00:35:15.840 --> 00:35:21.000 know, referring your colleagues is also a really good way to make friends and 520 00:35:21.400 --> 00:35:27.599 uh, and getting to know people a lot. Um really the voiceover Um. 521 00:35:28.760 --> 00:35:34.679 The community that I'm aware of is Um mostly on facebook. So I 522 00:35:34.960 --> 00:35:38.639 am in a number of facebook groups. There are a huge number of them 523 00:35:39.119 --> 00:35:43.440 and you can just check out many of those groups and join a few and 524 00:35:44.000 --> 00:35:47.119 ask questions there and, you know, get to know people. So getting 525 00:35:47.159 --> 00:35:51.639 to know your colleagues is a really good thing. Um. There's also a 526 00:35:52.159 --> 00:36:00.719 industry association called World Voices Part of me, which I believe is World Dash 527 00:36:00.960 --> 00:36:07.320 Voices Dot Org. I believe, Um, but you can look it up. 528 00:36:07.360 --> 00:36:10.079 It's just called world voices. So if you look at the Industry Association 529 00:36:10.239 --> 00:36:16.639 joining that, there are mentors there, there are all sorts of resources and 530 00:36:16.760 --> 00:36:21.280 things like that that you can look into and it's a good place to be. 531 00:36:22.239 --> 00:36:23.239 M. Yeah, that's cool. Yeah, it's cool. Yeah, 532 00:36:23.280 --> 00:36:30.800 World Dash voices dot or hyphen say that. Yeah, this is why I 533 00:36:30.880 --> 00:36:36.440 can't read scripts, because that's just about hyphen Um. So yeah, that 534 00:36:36.599 --> 00:36:42.519 is that's an amazing world dot or world hyphen voices dot org is the website. 535 00:36:42.559 --> 00:36:45.519 So make sure you guys can check that out and I feel like we 536 00:36:45.599 --> 00:36:50.280 could talk for days about the business of voice over, because we've I feel 537 00:36:50.280 --> 00:36:52.559 like we described like the little bit of the surface, because I'm over here 538 00:36:52.599 --> 00:36:55.440 like what about cartoon work? What you know? And about this? What 539 00:36:55.559 --> 00:36:58.840 about games? What about this? You know? So I know that you 540 00:36:58.920 --> 00:37:02.760 could probably go, you know, on for for several hours about this industry 541 00:37:02.800 --> 00:37:07.840 and I think it's really neat that you have so much power in your voice 542 00:37:08.400 --> 00:37:14.320 to go and create streams of revenue with with a microphone and so. So 543 00:37:14.519 --> 00:37:16.679 what real quick, because I'm a nerd when it comes to gear. What 544 00:37:17.000 --> 00:37:21.679 what is the gear that you use, or is there a certain type of 545 00:37:21.760 --> 00:37:25.239 gear? How complicated is it? How what does that look like? Well, 546 00:37:25.320 --> 00:37:29.079 you can sort of see the booth behind me. Um, there, 547 00:37:30.639 --> 00:37:36.119 I mirrored. Um, the booth is five by four. It's sound treated. 548 00:37:36.239 --> 00:37:39.079 It's not sound proved. So it's really hard to get something completely sound 549 00:37:39.119 --> 00:37:43.800 proof. It can be done, but it's very, very expensive to do 550 00:37:44.159 --> 00:37:47.360 less expensive, still a little pricey, but less expensive to do a booth 551 00:37:47.400 --> 00:37:52.480 that is sound treated and Um, that inside that booth I have a Sindheiser 552 00:37:52.559 --> 00:37:58.360 for sixteen, which is a shotgun Mike, and I'm using an audio interface 553 00:37:58.559 --> 00:38:04.800 called the Steinber, you are twenty two C and uh, that is basic. 554 00:38:05.280 --> 00:38:07.519 You know that. In my computer are basically what I use and I 555 00:38:07.800 --> 00:38:13.440 edit on adobe audition in the clouds, so the latest version. And I'm 556 00:38:13.480 --> 00:38:16.159 on a PC, which isn't the usual. I know that a lot of 557 00:38:16.199 --> 00:38:21.119 people are using Max for audio editing, but I've been on pc since toss, 558 00:38:21.760 --> 00:38:24.239 so I'm used to PCS. All right, yeah, Hey, you 559 00:38:24.320 --> 00:38:28.079 own it, if you if you love it, go for it. Yeah. 560 00:38:28.239 --> 00:38:30.679 Well, thanks for sharing that. And I think you know that's another 561 00:38:30.800 --> 00:38:35.440 thing that Um, that people considers the microphone. So so is it a 562 00:38:35.519 --> 00:38:37.320 condenser? Is it picking up everywhere? or well, you said shotguns, 563 00:38:37.400 --> 00:38:42.320 so it's more it is the shotguns. That's very directional. Yeah, but 564 00:38:42.519 --> 00:38:46.079 but it is a condenser Mike. Yeah, that's picking up all the the 565 00:38:46.199 --> 00:38:50.199 clarity. I mean that's gonna film. I mean obviously that sounds really good. 566 00:38:50.280 --> 00:38:52.159 So so, and I guess these people are. They're taking it their 567 00:38:52.400 --> 00:38:57.400 companies, their producers. Um, are you shocked when it comes back? 568 00:38:57.480 --> 00:39:00.559 Are you're like wow, that they really did too much process saying, or 569 00:39:00.800 --> 00:39:02.400 do you like really have an opinion, or you're like thanks for my check, 570 00:39:02.519 --> 00:39:07.000 see you later. I'm kind of like thanks for my check. Honestly, 571 00:39:08.159 --> 00:39:10.440 I mean, you know, it's interesting to hear it. I always 572 00:39:10.519 --> 00:39:15.400 love hearing my voice out in the wild. Like, you know, I'm 573 00:39:15.480 --> 00:39:19.639 spending in a restaurant and a television above the bar is playing a commercial. 574 00:39:19.760 --> 00:39:23.920 I did like that's just cool. Has Anybody ever been like wait, that 575 00:39:24.000 --> 00:39:30.239 sounds like you, like bartender. Yeah, now, that is a funny 576 00:39:30.679 --> 00:39:34.280 you know, because when I was when I was playing music a lot when 577 00:39:34.280 --> 00:39:37.920 I was younger, if I went to a concert, I almost couldn't enjoy 578 00:39:37.039 --> 00:39:42.800 it because I was so like caught up in the how to or whatever. 579 00:39:43.199 --> 00:39:45.159 I'm not really like that with podcasting as much, because I'm more of the 580 00:39:46.000 --> 00:39:49.400 you know, like more of the business side of it, trying to generate 581 00:39:49.480 --> 00:39:52.760 revenue, not really the production side. But do you find yourself that way 582 00:39:52.800 --> 00:39:54.199 too, like, oh my gosh, I can't even listen to this anymore. 583 00:39:54.239 --> 00:39:58.639 I could get out of here. You know, it's less about voiceovers 584 00:39:58.679 --> 00:40:02.000 and more about music. It sounds really strange to say, but when I 585 00:40:02.119 --> 00:40:07.000 am relaxing, I don't listen to music. I need peace and quiet. 586 00:40:07.400 --> 00:40:10.079 That's that's the weird thing. Like I'm a singer right. So you think, 587 00:40:10.199 --> 00:40:14.199 Oh, I'd want to listen to music all the time, but no, 588 00:40:14.559 --> 00:40:17.880 I kind of don't, because what happens for me is I do like 589 00:40:19.079 --> 00:40:22.119 you were saying. I analyze it a lot and when I'm analyzing it I 590 00:40:22.199 --> 00:40:28.280 can't relax listen. Yeah, it gives me a headache. Are you still 591 00:40:28.320 --> 00:40:31.039 putting together albums? I know you're. You put your jazz album out and 592 00:40:31.119 --> 00:40:34.920 blues and stuff like that. Are you're still working on your music career? 593 00:40:35.920 --> 00:40:39.119 Not Really, to be honest. I do a lot of backups for colleagues 594 00:40:39.199 --> 00:40:43.719 of mine, friends that want to back up singing. Um, you know, 595 00:40:44.159 --> 00:40:46.280 I would do something for a jingle, but you know, again, 596 00:40:47.119 --> 00:40:52.960 jingles singing is one of those things where generally they want like a higher voice 597 00:40:52.000 --> 00:40:57.760 than mine is. Mine's Very Alto and and like a bit lower register. 598 00:40:58.400 --> 00:41:01.079 So you know, if you want like Katie Perry, you're not coming to 599 00:41:01.159 --> 00:41:08.599 me right. So, yeah, that's so funny. Don't don't call me. 600 00:41:08.719 --> 00:41:12.119 I'm not singing anything, that's for sure. My wife would be like, 601 00:41:12.199 --> 00:41:15.199 honey, don't try, I actually need to make money. Alright, 602 00:41:15.280 --> 00:41:20.440 stop wasting time. Uh Well, jody, I really appreciate you coming on. 603 00:41:20.639 --> 00:41:22.880 I would love to have you back on because I know we could dive 604 00:41:22.000 --> 00:41:27.360 into audio branding and I know you you know a plethora about just audio in 605 00:41:27.480 --> 00:41:30.159 general. Um, way more than what we dove into today, and I 606 00:41:30.239 --> 00:41:35.000 got on a little rabbit trail of voiceover because I'm so curious about it and 607 00:41:35.039 --> 00:41:37.440 I think there's a lot of other creators who, hopefully they're curious as well, 608 00:41:37.559 --> 00:41:39.760 and can you know, and they have those really good voices. Like 609 00:41:39.840 --> 00:41:43.760 I saw some people in the chat where I'm like, HMM, that person 610 00:41:43.840 --> 00:41:47.440 has a really good voice. So last question, as I'm landing the plane 611 00:41:47.480 --> 00:41:52.559 for the third time here. Okay, do you ever find yourself like you 612 00:41:52.760 --> 00:41:57.400 got a great voice, I want to recruit you and teach you this business? 613 00:41:57.440 --> 00:41:59.800 Like, have you ever come across those people, or is that not 614 00:42:00.039 --> 00:42:07.960 even like like people talking to me saying that I'm saying for you someone else. 615 00:42:07.079 --> 00:42:09.679 Yeah, yeah, you, as someone who's in that industry, you're 616 00:42:09.679 --> 00:42:14.320 like wow, you crush it, like let me, let me introduce you 617 00:42:14.360 --> 00:42:16.400 to somebody or anything like. Have you ever just had those moments? You 618 00:42:16.480 --> 00:42:21.760 know, it's actually no, and and the reason that I haven't is because 619 00:42:21.880 --> 00:42:24.360 it's less about the sound of your voice and more about what you do with 620 00:42:24.519 --> 00:42:30.159 it. So someone who's already a really good actor. Yeah, sure, 621 00:42:30.400 --> 00:42:34.159 I mean I can definitely introduce people to the right the right people. Yeah, 622 00:42:34.559 --> 00:42:37.880 I know demo producers out there. In fact, we're having a clubhouse 623 00:42:37.960 --> 00:42:42.760 discussion on that very topic Wednesday. Um, not this coming Wednesday. I 624 00:42:42.800 --> 00:42:45.440 think it's in the schedule, but we have chats Wednesdays at two PM Eastern 625 00:42:45.960 --> 00:42:50.920 on clubhouse in the power of sound club and one of them is going to 626 00:42:51.039 --> 00:42:53.480 be about why get coaching, and so I have a bunch of really well 627 00:42:53.519 --> 00:42:58.280 known coaches that are going to be on that panel talking about why it's important 628 00:42:58.320 --> 00:43:01.280 to have a coach. All right, that's all right. Yeah, but 629 00:43:01.440 --> 00:43:06.880 no, I I don't tend to just hear someone's voice and go ha ha, 630 00:43:07.639 --> 00:43:12.320 I must know who you are like that. Just that that doesn't happen, 631 00:43:12.960 --> 00:43:15.039 because it's so funny, because I hear people, especially on Clubhouse, 632 00:43:15.119 --> 00:43:17.400 on these audio APPs. They're like, Oh, you have a great voice 633 00:43:17.400 --> 00:43:21.840 for radio, you have great voice for voiceover, and but what you just 634 00:43:21.920 --> 00:43:24.360 said, it's more about the talent or the skill of acting than it is 635 00:43:24.519 --> 00:43:28.320 about the voice. So it's about, you know, like a singer, 636 00:43:28.400 --> 00:43:30.239 it's like you can sing, but can you really sing? Can you really 637 00:43:30.280 --> 00:43:36.239 control you alost? Can you make people feel? Right? Like that's really 638 00:43:36.320 --> 00:43:38.960 what it is. You're you're trying to make people feel. And when it 639 00:43:39.039 --> 00:43:44.400 comes to voice acting, it's a discussion. It's actually a dialogue the other 640 00:43:44.519 --> 00:43:46.760 person. You may not hear that other person, but it is actually a 641 00:43:46.880 --> 00:43:52.599 dialogue that you're having with someone else. So you're blowing my mind right now 642 00:43:52.679 --> 00:43:55.119 with a little just these little, these little things you're putting in here. 643 00:43:55.159 --> 00:43:59.599 I'm like, wow, okay, this is think about this. But that's 644 00:43:59.639 --> 00:44:01.440 the act ting aspect of it, right, because you have to have a 645 00:44:01.599 --> 00:44:08.000 really good theater of the mind to be able to have this script and perform 646 00:44:08.119 --> 00:44:13.960 it as if you are actually talking to someone in that moment. I love 647 00:44:14.079 --> 00:44:16.639 this. That's a whole another topic, the theater of the mind. That's 648 00:44:16.679 --> 00:44:22.320 something I hear in your rooms a lot and it's Um it's definitely something, 649 00:44:22.400 --> 00:44:27.079 I think that even podcasters can get better at. Live streamers, I mean, 650 00:44:27.119 --> 00:44:30.960 we talked to ourselves the time. It's like to have to be able 651 00:44:31.039 --> 00:44:36.280 to creatively have that dialogue. It is very powerful. So that's Um, 652 00:44:36.679 --> 00:44:38.079 you got my mind. Now you get my mind even more. Where's that 653 00:44:38.159 --> 00:44:42.960 EMOGIA? Where's that? Talking a padded room all day? So yeah, 654 00:44:44.480 --> 00:44:52.039 I'm looking around to myself wait to get way. The only thing missing is 655 00:44:52.119 --> 00:44:55.679 the jacket. I'll get you one for Christmas. I'll send it up to 656 00:44:55.800 --> 00:45:00.719 you. Well, jody, I really appreciate you coming on the show and 657 00:45:00.840 --> 00:45:05.880 I believe I've linked all your website and everything in the show notes. So 658 00:45:05.920 --> 00:45:08.639 there might be people listening to this who need your services or want your services. 659 00:45:08.679 --> 00:45:12.000 So I want them to feel free to reach out to you and then 660 00:45:12.079 --> 00:45:15.119 also join your clubhouse room on Wednesday at two PM Eastern time. Is that 661 00:45:15.159 --> 00:45:20.599 correct? Ye, and I helped listen to the podcast and listen to your 662 00:45:20.639 --> 00:45:22.760 show, which I'm I'm gonna put all that in the in the show notes 663 00:45:22.800 --> 00:45:27.320 there. I'll make sure I get it right and and really appreciate you being 664 00:45:27.599 --> 00:45:30.599 on the show. This is amazing. So thank you so much. Thanks 665 00:45:30.639 --> 00:45:34.199 so much for having me. Really enjoyed this all right, absolutely well. 666 00:45:34.599 --> 00:45:37.840 Thank you everyone for joining, for jumping in. If you're watching live, 667 00:45:37.920 --> 00:45:40.639 thanks for jumping into the chat. I see triple Oh Adam, triple eight 668 00:45:40.840 --> 00:45:44.920 Adams. What's up, my man? Good to see you it's been a 669 00:45:45.000 --> 00:45:47.719 minute since I've seen you. So good to see there. Good to see 670 00:45:47.880 --> 00:45:52.719 Chris and Jim and Raphael and all the people who jumped in there. Really 671 00:45:52.760 --> 00:45:54.800 appreciate that. And you guys go follow jody. I'm telling you, she 672 00:45:55.000 --> 00:45:59.559 is a wealth of information, as you can obviously tell. and Um, 673 00:46:00.000 --> 00:46:01.760 next time I'M gonna study a little bit more. That way I can ask 674 00:46:02.000 --> 00:46:06.480 better, smarter questions, because I was like, man, I'm an amateur 675 00:46:06.800 --> 00:46:10.800 voice actor enthusiasts. Not Really, but anyhow. Um, so join me 676 00:46:12.159 --> 00:46:15.239 Thursday. I'M gonna be back Thursday at four PM with Richard Butler. He 677 00:46:15.360 --> 00:46:19.719 has been podcasting, I'm pretty sure, since podcasting became a thing, and 678 00:46:19.840 --> 00:46:23.159 so we're gonna dump and we're gonna jump into the history of podcasting in and 679 00:46:23.280 --> 00:46:28.079 kind of jump into that and see. You know someone who's been in there 680 00:46:28.119 --> 00:46:30.760 for a long time. What does he think about the start? What do 681 00:46:30.880 --> 00:46:32.559 you think about where it's going and all that kind of stuff. So be 682 00:46:32.599 --> 00:46:37.079 sure to join me, Richard Butler, four PM Eastern time on Thursday. 683 00:46:37.519 --> 00:46:42.960 What's up, GOB says. What's up everyone? UH, studying is for 684 00:46:43.119 --> 00:46:45.679 nerds, Billy Thorpe. That's right, man. That is right. I 685 00:46:45.760 --> 00:46:47.159 love studying, always learning something new. All right, well, you guys, 686 00:46:47.239 --> 00:46:51.199 go ahead to record button, go create something great and we'll talk to 687 00:46:51.280 --> 00:47:00.159 you soon. m