March 30, 2022

How Do You Learn To Create?

How Do You Learn To Create?

Are some people just born a "creative" or is it a skill we can learn? I'm joined by graphic designer and podcaster Alex Villacis to see if we can unlock the secret sauce of creativity.  

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Transcript
WEBVTT 1 00:00:00.000 --> 00:00:05.400 Are Center. We can really like you're listening to creating daily. There's something 2 00:00:05.440 --> 00:00:08.160 wrong with you. You know that, because you and I are like a 3 00:00:08.240 --> 00:00:11.839 mullets. It is the is the business. So he's the front part of 4 00:00:11.839 --> 00:00:15.359 the haircut and then I'm the party in the back. I think they're hilarious. 5 00:00:15.759 --> 00:00:21.640 Speaks to me. It's like he's saying what I'm thinking. All right, 6 00:00:21.679 --> 00:00:25.519 what is up, everybody? Welcome to another episode of creating daily. 7 00:00:26.120 --> 00:00:29.239 In today I'm going to be joined here in a few minutes with my by 8 00:00:29.280 --> 00:00:33.119 my friend Ale Handra, and we're going to talk about the creative process and 9 00:00:33.159 --> 00:00:35.920 how do you learn how to create? Can you learn how to create? 10 00:00:36.000 --> 00:00:39.359 Are you born a creator? Like what does that process look like? So 11 00:00:39.399 --> 00:00:42.799 we're going to get get that from her perspective, as she is a graphic 12 00:00:42.840 --> 00:00:46.640 designer and a podcaster, which two of my favorite things. My wife is 13 00:00:46.640 --> 00:00:50.280 a graphic designer and I'm a podcaster, so she's my wife and I together 14 00:00:50.399 --> 00:00:53.880 at the same time. Anyway, that's getting really weird. But before we 15 00:00:53.960 --> 00:00:58.439 jump into it, I want to get some house cleaning, house stuff out 16 00:00:58.479 --> 00:01:02.200 of the way, whatever this means. If you are on clubhouse and you've 17 00:01:02.240 --> 00:01:06.280 been listening to us on clubhouse. Beginning next week we are not going to 18 00:01:06.280 --> 00:01:10.480 stream on clubhouse, so click the link in the little pen link section and 19 00:01:10.519 --> 00:01:14.959 be sure to subscribe to our Youtube Channel or follow us on facebook or twitter 20 00:01:15.040 --> 00:01:19.959 or wherever else we're streaming, to twitch youtube and subscribe to one of those 21 00:01:19.040 --> 00:01:23.959 channels, because we are not going to stream audio over there anymore. We're 22 00:01:23.000 --> 00:01:26.799 going to finish up this week. So that is a little bit of that. 23 00:01:26.840 --> 00:01:27.640 Now. Anyway, enough of that stuff. Just want to make that 24 00:01:27.680 --> 00:01:33.480 announcement and, as always, to kick the show off we got Creator highlights. 25 00:01:33.640 --> 00:01:40.359 No cooking necessary and the assembly required. It's got to be fuck all 26 00:01:40.480 --> 00:01:44.359 right. This week our creator highlight is brought to you by one sheet pro. 27 00:01:44.560 --> 00:01:46.879 So, if you're watching the video, go to on sheeet dot pro 28 00:01:47.319 --> 00:01:49.719 Billy Thorpe to go check it out. It is a creator profile, it 29 00:01:49.799 --> 00:01:53.640 is a press kit and Media Kit, all those fun things. So if 30 00:01:53.680 --> 00:01:57.439 you want to get booked on more shows as a creator, go to one 31 00:01:57.519 --> 00:02:00.519 sheet and set that up. And then the beauty is you can also get 32 00:02:00.560 --> 00:02:06.079 paid from just being on the platform as people, because it has an auto 33 00:02:06.159 --> 00:02:08.360 affiliate program that you can sign up for. So there you go so you 34 00:02:08.360 --> 00:02:10.360 can you can get paid for that. So if you get a on sheeet. 35 00:02:10.400 --> 00:02:14.759 So that's the number one sheet dot pro, Billy Thorpe. If you're 36 00:02:14.800 --> 00:02:19.479 listening or if you're somewhere close, there's a link by with some show linked 37 00:02:19.560 --> 00:02:21.759 that's going to take you to my one sheet pro you can check it out, 38 00:02:21.840 --> 00:02:24.479 you can see what I've done with it and then you can scroll down 39 00:02:24.479 --> 00:02:28.240 on the bottom, click on one sheet and if you buy the pro version 40 00:02:28.360 --> 00:02:30.520 there's a free version, but if you buy the pro version I get a 41 00:02:30.520 --> 00:02:36.360 small commission. So today's creator highlight goes to Andrew Rousseau. I don't really 42 00:02:36.360 --> 00:02:38.719 know much about any but he's a comedian that I follow on instagram and I 43 00:02:38.759 --> 00:02:42.280 was just finished laughing at one of his videos and I thought, you know 44 00:02:42.319 --> 00:02:45.599 what, this is pretty awesome. So I've invited him on the show and 45 00:02:45.639 --> 00:02:49.840 then also wanted to highlight him as a creator. Super Funny Guy. Makes 46 00:02:49.879 --> 00:02:54.360 some really funny skip videos on instagram. But I will say where some headphones 47 00:02:54.400 --> 00:02:57.800 if you got little ones running around, because some of it can get a 48 00:02:57.800 --> 00:03:00.400 little wild. But I can't help with the laugh I think it's so funny. 49 00:03:00.439 --> 00:03:02.879 So all right, so that's a little creator highlight for you. And 50 00:03:02.960 --> 00:03:10.439 now we got some that's news to me. Creating daily. All right, 51 00:03:10.479 --> 00:03:15.960 it looks like that Youtube could potentially be getting into the podcasting game. According 52 00:03:16.000 --> 00:03:19.560 to Pod News, which you don't follow upon news, just do it, 53 00:03:19.560 --> 00:03:23.319 okay. They get a daily podcasting the all the podcasting news. And I 54 00:03:23.360 --> 00:03:25.719 just got this in my inbox this morning from pod news that there's not been 55 00:03:25.719 --> 00:03:31.080 an official statement from Youtube, but they did send out an extensive guide or 56 00:03:31.159 --> 00:03:35.439 like a like kind of I don't know what it was, some extensive information 57 00:03:35.560 --> 00:03:42.240 packet, of information document that was sent to some media outlets to talk about 58 00:03:42.360 --> 00:03:47.120 Youtube and podcasting and maybe even potentially putting rss feeds on their platform. So 59 00:03:47.159 --> 00:03:52.080 there you go, you or podcasters. Maybe Youtube cares about you now, 60 00:03:52.120 --> 00:03:54.680 maybe they care about us. I get a lot of people from Youtube to 61 00:03:54.680 --> 00:03:58.759 watch my other show, not this show in particular because we just started it, 62 00:03:58.800 --> 00:04:00.080 but my other show. That's where I feel like a lot of our 63 00:04:00.080 --> 00:04:03.000 audience came from. So now if you tube puts a little focus on that, 64 00:04:02.759 --> 00:04:06.080 that's going to be really awesome. Really excited about that. So keep 65 00:04:06.120 --> 00:04:12.439 your eye out for new opportunities in your on your account there for your podcast 66 00:04:12.560 --> 00:04:16.360 to go the actual RSS feed to go onto YouTube. So pretty cool. 67 00:04:16.519 --> 00:04:19.839 But once again, that's just a couple little segments to break up the show. 68 00:04:19.839 --> 00:04:23.879 But I want to jump right in here with my friend Ali Handra, 69 00:04:23.920 --> 00:04:27.560 and she's just joining me from all the way over across somewhere else in the 70 00:04:27.560 --> 00:04:30.000 world, and we're going to get to all that. She has a graphic 71 00:04:30.079 --> 00:04:33.560 designer, she's a podcaster and her podcast is called do I need to do? 72 00:04:33.639 --> 00:04:39.399 I need school to be I love this question. Do I need school 73 00:04:39.439 --> 00:04:43.079 to be a doctor, a graphic designer, website developer? All this one 74 00:04:43.160 --> 00:04:44.839 thing. So anyway, I'm going to shut up now. I'm going to 75 00:04:44.879 --> 00:04:47.240 bring my friend Alex on. Alex, how are you good? To See 76 00:04:47.240 --> 00:04:50.319 you? Don't answer because I haven't known muted you yet, because I always 77 00:04:50.319 --> 00:04:56.519 forget to do this. And there we go. Perfect. Hey, billy, 78 00:04:56.639 --> 00:04:59.879 I goes a hurt now that I'm on Mute, on Mute on me, 79 00:05:00.000 --> 00:05:03.439 that death. Sorry, it's it's a Wednesday. It's he looks one 80 00:05:03.519 --> 00:05:11.279 say it's a Wednesday. Yeah, I feel a hurt. I'n't seen and 81 00:05:11.560 --> 00:05:15.160 you should. You're here. You're on the creating daily show. All twelve 82 00:05:15.199 --> 00:05:18.519 people are watching US right now. I know, I'm so excited. Hey, 83 00:05:18.600 --> 00:05:23.759 twelve people, ex twelve people. If there's something that I've learned from 84 00:05:23.839 --> 00:05:28.560 you, billy, it's that an audience is an audience. Doesn't have to 85 00:05:28.600 --> 00:05:31.120 be gigantic. It can just be a few good people listening to you. 86 00:05:31.199 --> 00:05:34.040 Why not? What is the problem with that? Yeah, right, yeah, 87 00:05:34.079 --> 00:05:36.839 you just gotta have yeah, that's it. Just get find your people. 88 00:05:36.879 --> 00:05:42.040 Slow and steady growth is always good. So don't want to be in 89 00:05:42.040 --> 00:05:45.720 a hurry to do that. So so, so, only hundred. Take 90 00:05:45.800 --> 00:05:48.360 us through, and I'm going to probably get between a hundred Alex and and 91 00:05:48.360 --> 00:05:53.199 whatnot. It's just how I am. So it's fine. Both are good. 92 00:05:53.199 --> 00:05:56.519 All right, perfect, all right, cool. So take us before 93 00:05:56.519 --> 00:05:59.279 we jump into you know, can we learn to creator? How do we 94 00:05:59.360 --> 00:06:01.800 learn to create? Take us a little bit through your Creator Journey, how 95 00:06:01.839 --> 00:06:05.680 you got to the point of being in graphic design and podcasting and all the 96 00:06:05.800 --> 00:06:13.600 multih things you do as a creator. Oh, well, some little background 97 00:06:13.639 --> 00:06:17.279 story. Let's complicate it. Well, so did I love suit? I 98 00:06:17.279 --> 00:06:21.000 don't know if I lost you. Okay, I'm on airs. I'm getting 99 00:06:21.000 --> 00:06:24.000 this. Still there you are. We're still here. We're still hey, 100 00:06:24.120 --> 00:06:26.839 you just see what I see. Sorry, I didn't tell you that before. 101 00:06:27.879 --> 00:06:31.800 Okay, cool, Um. Well, so I am Alex or Alejandra. 102 00:06:31.959 --> 00:06:36.519 The reason that I use those two naves it's because I'm originally from Eculor 103 00:06:36.560 --> 00:06:41.839 so from Latin America, but I live in I live in a English speaking, 104 00:06:41.879 --> 00:06:46.839 of Dutch English speaking country. So for a lot of people is way 105 00:06:46.879 --> 00:06:50.199 easier to just go by like call me Alex because all, that's why my 106 00:06:50.240 --> 00:06:54.040 Grandpa, by grandparents called me when I was little. So I'm fine with 107 00:06:54.079 --> 00:06:59.759 that. But yeah, I'm a graphic designer. I have been. I 108 00:06:59.800 --> 00:07:03.519 have two degrees. I have one from it's a call and op lighting in 109 00:07:03.639 --> 00:07:06.439 Dutch, or an US be doing in German, which is a technical degree 110 00:07:06.480 --> 00:07:15.040 in graphic design, and I did that when I failed out of German high 111 00:07:15.079 --> 00:07:17.920 school because I wanted to go into engineering, because in Latin America, being 112 00:07:17.920 --> 00:07:23.160 a creator it's basically want to start to death, or that's the the idea 113 00:07:23.240 --> 00:07:26.920 that it's put in our heads. So I decided, okay, I want 114 00:07:26.959 --> 00:07:30.240 to create something, but in a more financial, a sustainable way. So 115 00:07:30.279 --> 00:07:34.879 I wanted to go into engineering. Then I decided okay, engineering, my 116 00:07:35.000 --> 00:07:40.319 not be my deal, since I fell at a school and I went into 117 00:07:40.360 --> 00:07:45.600 this graphic design program and I went there for three and a half I did 118 00:07:45.600 --> 00:07:46.879 that for three and a half years. Then I went to work in this 119 00:07:47.040 --> 00:07:51.800 big, big data company where my job was to create info graphics. I 120 00:07:51.839 --> 00:07:58.360 love INPO graphics. They're Super Fun, they're super interesting, but I didn't 121 00:07:58.399 --> 00:08:01.319 feel very challenge creatively. I was like, okay, I'm making the same 122 00:08:01.360 --> 00:08:05.079 thing over and over again. It's great, it has value, but I 123 00:08:05.120 --> 00:08:11.560 don't really feel that creative. So I decided to go back to school and 124 00:08:11.639 --> 00:08:16.720 get my second degree as a graphic designer in a very art see Art Academy 125 00:08:16.800 --> 00:08:22.399 in The Netherlands, and I've been freelancing ever since and discovering more avenues to 126 00:08:22.439 --> 00:08:26.480 create by creating a podcast. I also do service design, which is create 127 00:08:26.600 --> 00:08:33.039 services. Actually like creating services, which is something we are like. We 128 00:08:33.039 --> 00:08:35.240 don't think about it. We always think creative things are super arts and I 129 00:08:35.279 --> 00:08:39.000 think that's what challenges a lot of people. They're like, I cannot write 130 00:08:39.000 --> 00:08:43.799 a symphony, therefore I'm not creative. I cannot paint a portrait, therefore 131 00:08:43.840 --> 00:08:48.399 I'm not creative. But creativity comes in so many shapes and sizes and ways 132 00:08:48.480 --> 00:08:54.960 and it's about making connections and finding new avenues. So, if you that's 133 00:08:54.039 --> 00:08:58.320 actually the point of my podcast, that everybody can be creative and just how 134 00:08:58.360 --> 00:09:01.879 we become creative, how learned how to be creative. Think a lot of 135 00:09:01.879 --> 00:09:05.000 them are focused on the amazing artists and I love learning the stories about amazing 136 00:09:05.080 --> 00:09:09.720 artists, but I'm also very curious about how other people became creative, how 137 00:09:09.840 --> 00:09:15.919 create care tvd he's taught how we learned that. And Yeah, I think 138 00:09:15.919 --> 00:09:16.960 that's a that's a little bit I don't want to get to her head of 139 00:09:18.039 --> 00:09:20.159 the show. Yeah, you're good. I love that story show. Yeah, 140 00:09:20.159 --> 00:09:22.919 I love that story and you know, I mentioned earlier that my wife 141 00:09:24.000 --> 00:09:28.799 is also a graphic designer and she actually went through nursing school and was almost 142 00:09:28.840 --> 00:09:33.879 finished with nursing school and then I think someone spit their false teeth into her 143 00:09:33.919 --> 00:09:37.639 hand for her to clean them and then she was like, you know what, 144 00:09:37.720 --> 00:09:39.879 this isn't really for me, and so she went, you know, 145 00:09:41.000 --> 00:09:46.639 left nursing school, went to a graphic design actually wasn't really like I think 146 00:09:46.639 --> 00:09:50.720 it was like video game design. That's type of program graphic design, video 147 00:09:50.759 --> 00:09:54.360 game illustrator, all that kind of fun stuff and and so that's what she 148 00:09:54.360 --> 00:09:56.240 did. She went back to school and I find a lot of creators have 149 00:09:56.360 --> 00:10:01.519 that same you know, people who are interested in more the arts creativity. 150 00:10:01.519 --> 00:10:05.279 What kind of talk about that and then we'll go into how most stuff, 151 00:10:05.279 --> 00:10:09.120 and I mean I think everything in life is creative or can be, but 152 00:10:09.159 --> 00:10:11.639 I find a lot of people have that mental block and maybe it is taught 153 00:10:11.639 --> 00:10:16.960 in our society, like artists or poor. Creators are poor. If you 154 00:10:16.080 --> 00:10:20.679 if you want to be poured, then you do this. But I don't 155 00:10:20.679 --> 00:10:24.120 know when it flipped. I know my wife makes really good money as a 156 00:10:24.159 --> 00:10:28.080 graphic designer and so I'm like, I don't know what you guys are talking 157 00:10:28.080 --> 00:10:33.600 about. Maybe she took a different route, but were I guess you were 158 00:10:33.639 --> 00:10:35.120 told that as well. That was seems like it was kind of your story 159 00:10:35.120 --> 00:10:39.559 as well, like, but did you know it from early on that you 160 00:10:39.639 --> 00:10:46.240 were creative, so to speaking, art to creative? Well, I was 161 00:10:46.279 --> 00:10:50.159 always tall. I was always told that it that I was. So if 162 00:10:50.200 --> 00:10:54.279 you ask, my grandparents still say like I always knew that she was creative. 163 00:10:54.320 --> 00:10:58.480 My parents were actually like I always had a very strong imagination my parents 164 00:10:58.480 --> 00:11:03.519 were actually scared of me at one point because I remember when I was little 165 00:11:03.559 --> 00:11:09.279 I had this book in school. It was called Blue Planet, and I 166 00:11:09.320 --> 00:11:11.639 came up with the story that I had a family in blue planet and when 167 00:11:11.679 --> 00:11:15.240 my mom told me, like, you have to eat Broccoli, I was 168 00:11:15.279 --> 00:11:18.120 like well, my mommy blue planet, never makes me eat broccoli or this 169 00:11:18.200 --> 00:11:24.360 and that. And my imaginary friends were not something that I kept secret. 170 00:11:24.480 --> 00:11:28.840 Like I would say to my parents, Oh, don't sit there because my 171 00:11:28.879 --> 00:11:31.120 little brother is sitting there, and the mom was like, each is she 172 00:11:31.240 --> 00:11:37.759 seeing ghosts? Wow, should we worry about this? So you had a 173 00:11:37.799 --> 00:11:41.519 whole like alternative family on a different planet in your mind when you're a little 174 00:11:41.600 --> 00:11:45.960 kid. That's cool. Yeah, and I didn't hide it. My Dad 175 00:11:46.080 --> 00:11:48.559 was the world that she will grow out of it. If she does, 176 00:11:48.600 --> 00:11:52.399 said, then we need to have a say once or like throw a holy 177 00:11:52.440 --> 00:11:54.600 water on her, but she will grow out of it. But that was 178 00:11:54.600 --> 00:11:58.000 always the thing. I always wanted to do something creative, like in school, 179 00:11:58.000 --> 00:12:03.679 I always leaned toward drawing, leaned toward making things and like telling stories, 180 00:12:03.720 --> 00:12:07.159 and it was really fund for me like getting an assignment at school for 181 00:12:07.360 --> 00:12:13.120 like writing assignment I love that, or watching movies or always, like I 182 00:12:13.159 --> 00:12:16.480 have, always a very active imagination. You know, the thing that they 183 00:12:16.519 --> 00:12:22.000 already does, that you have an argument with somebody and you create scenarious and 184 00:12:22.000 --> 00:12:24.120 you're like, Oh, I should have said that, I should have done 185 00:12:24.159 --> 00:12:26.639 that, I should have done like I take that into overdrive. I came 186 00:12:26.720 --> 00:12:33.559 up with I come up with a whole scenarian story and different possible alternative futures 187 00:12:33.600 --> 00:12:37.320 and or passed past, because the arguman past. But still like. So 188 00:12:37.879 --> 00:12:43.120 I always knew, or I always wanted to do something creative. The question 189 00:12:43.279 --> 00:12:46.000 was, what am I going to do? How I'm I going to support 190 00:12:46.120 --> 00:12:50.480 myself? Is it possible, and I totally agree with you, that every 191 00:12:50.480 --> 00:12:54.440 word, every job is creative. I mean, I am not supporting creative 192 00:12:54.480 --> 00:13:03.720 accounting. Creative accounting, it's kind of dicey term if you think about it. 193 00:13:03.080 --> 00:13:05.679 Yeah, right, like, I know, I want my account it 194 00:13:05.759 --> 00:13:11.960 to be creative, that's for sure. Give me paid last us, as 195 00:13:11.000 --> 00:13:16.480 long as they make it legal and completely fine, a creative accounting. I 196 00:13:16.000 --> 00:13:20.080 for example. So, I am a German citizen because I list in Germany 197 00:13:20.120 --> 00:13:28.440 for a very long time and I remember clearly as when I graduated from school. 198 00:13:28.480 --> 00:13:33.320 I needed to change my so to a drop searching Viza, which I 199 00:13:33.399 --> 00:13:39.159 was so night I paid in it. Oh, I think her. I 200 00:13:39.240 --> 00:13:43.120 think your Internet may have dropped out here. All right, we're gonna se 201 00:13:43.120 --> 00:13:45.120 if we could get all the hundre back on. Sorry about that. I 202 00:13:45.120 --> 00:13:50.120 think her Internet just dropped out. So we will. We will resume accordingly. 203 00:13:50.320 --> 00:13:54.399 So we're talking about just to kind of reset the live stream a little 204 00:13:54.440 --> 00:14:00.200 bit here while we're waiting is we're talking to ally Hondra about the can you 205 00:14:00.240 --> 00:14:01.559 be creative? Can you learn how to create? And so we were just 206 00:14:01.639 --> 00:14:05.440 kind of getting some backstory from her and hopefully she can jump back in here 207 00:14:05.480 --> 00:14:09.720 really quickly with us. These things tend to happen sometimes when you're live streaming. 208 00:14:09.720 --> 00:14:13.679 So is what it is. But I will take this opportunity to remind 209 00:14:13.759 --> 00:14:16.360 you that if you're watching or wherever you're watching at, there's a link near 210 00:14:16.440 --> 00:14:20.240 you so you can click that link and go find out more about our daily 211 00:14:20.240 --> 00:14:22.799 show. And I believe he or she is. I'm going to try to 212 00:14:22.799 --> 00:14:28.720 pop. I'm gonna try to pull her back in real quick here. If 213 00:14:28.759 --> 00:14:31.320 it's gonna let me. Oh, no, I don't know if he camp's 214 00:14:31.320 --> 00:14:35.960 gonna let me. We'll see. All Right, I'm going to, I'M 215 00:14:35.960 --> 00:14:39.360 gonna. I'm gonna drop you out again, alle hundreds, if you can 216 00:14:39.440 --> 00:14:43.080 jump back in. It's not letting me bring you into the Oh man, 217 00:14:43.120 --> 00:14:46.840 it's not let me bring your in, but maybe if she can't get in 218 00:14:46.919 --> 00:14:50.039 this time, I'll just I'll have her jump into our clubhouse room and we'll 219 00:14:50.039 --> 00:14:52.440 bring your audience audio through in there. All right, so let's try one 220 00:14:52.440 --> 00:14:58.679 more time here. All right, it's not. Let me so, Alex. 221 00:14:58.720 --> 00:15:03.000 it's not let me bring you into e Cam for some reason. If 222 00:15:03.000 --> 00:15:03.919 you don't care, if you have your phone by, if you want to 223 00:15:03.960 --> 00:15:07.120 jump into the clubhouse room, I can just bring your audio through there. 224 00:15:07.120 --> 00:15:11.200 If you want. We can just go audio for the rest of it if 225 00:15:11.240 --> 00:15:16.320 you can hear me here. So if not, I don't know why this 226 00:15:16.399 --> 00:15:20.480 is doing that. So anyway, so we're waiting for jump back on. 227 00:15:20.679 --> 00:15:24.200 Something wrong with the Internet between my connection or her connection. We both agreed 228 00:15:24.279 --> 00:15:26.840 that maybe our internets weren't the best, but it's part of it. So 229 00:15:28.200 --> 00:15:31.000 while you're waiting or while we're waiting for her to jump into the clubhouse room 230 00:15:31.039 --> 00:15:35.399 here, if I can. I think she's going to jump in here in 231 00:15:35.399 --> 00:15:39.480 a second. Be sure to click the link near you go to creating daily 232 00:15:39.639 --> 00:15:41.840 dot live. You could check out all the links there, the one sheet, 233 00:15:41.879 --> 00:15:45.440 all that kind of fun stuff, and get a list of where we 234 00:15:45.480 --> 00:15:48.399 go live at as well. So hopefully she'll jump into the clubhouse room and 235 00:15:48.440 --> 00:15:54.360 will continue our conversation about creativity. I can getting some of her back story 236 00:15:54.480 --> 00:15:56.600 and then we're going to jump into some ways that you can learn how to 237 00:15:56.799 --> 00:16:02.039 create. All right, let's see one more time here on e Cam. 238 00:16:03.840 --> 00:16:10.759 Let's see. All right, let's see if it'll do it this way. 239 00:16:11.759 --> 00:16:14.399 All right, now let's jump back over. All right, I think it's 240 00:16:14.440 --> 00:16:18.159 working. I think it's working. Yeah, Yay, I restarted my Internet. 241 00:16:18.200 --> 00:16:22.679 So can you hear me? At least my my picture still like lagging, 242 00:16:22.799 --> 00:16:25.440 but yeah, you can hear me. Yeah, we can hear you 243 00:16:25.519 --> 00:16:27.159 and we can see it is lagging a little bit on my end. But 244 00:16:27.240 --> 00:16:32.519 no worries, we can continue on the conversation. So you were her day. 245 00:16:32.879 --> 00:16:34.360 So I don't know exactly what point you're at. You're telling me that 246 00:16:34.399 --> 00:16:38.480 you're a German citizen, and then that's the visa thing. Yeah, but 247 00:16:38.559 --> 00:16:44.200 it must thing. Yeah, so I had to switch visas and I remember 248 00:16:44.360 --> 00:16:48.679 that I went to the immigration office, immigration of the yeah, that's what 249 00:16:48.720 --> 00:16:53.519 you call immigration office. Yeah, and my case worker was Super Nice and 250 00:16:53.559 --> 00:17:00.120 she said like, okay, you don't fall specifically into any category, so 251 00:17:00.159 --> 00:17:03.720 I have to come up with something for you. What exactly do you want 252 00:17:03.759 --> 00:17:06.839 to do? And I'm like, I don't know, I want to find 253 00:17:06.880 --> 00:17:11.200 a job, I want to support myself, I want to work, I 254 00:17:11.599 --> 00:17:15.200 while I find my real job. So my real open, quote closs job. 255 00:17:15.759 --> 00:17:21.039 And she just took this book with all these statements and started just highlighting. 256 00:17:21.079 --> 00:17:23.359 Okay, this applies to young going to photocopy this and we'll patch this 257 00:17:23.400 --> 00:17:27.559 and we'll patch that in and we'll take that and we'll take this. Wait, 258 00:17:27.680 --> 00:17:30.680 how old are you? This is apply. Yes, it applies to 259 00:17:30.720 --> 00:17:33.319 you. Wait, this doesn't apply to you. So I thought she was 260 00:17:33.319 --> 00:17:36.039 being very creative in that moment. She saw that I had a problem, 261 00:17:36.039 --> 00:17:40.519 she learned what I needed, she asked me questions and she figure out a 262 00:17:40.559 --> 00:17:44.119 way to make connections and assistance that would work for me, and that's a 263 00:17:44.200 --> 00:17:48.920 creative process. So the person who works in the immigration office, I highly 264 00:17:48.000 --> 00:17:53.279 bureaucratic job that we would never see us creative, was actually extremely creative in 265 00:17:53.359 --> 00:18:00.240 how she did her job. So creativity can be in anything. It's it's 266 00:18:00.279 --> 00:18:06.079 not just the fine art, it's not just it's how you present yourself. 267 00:18:06.160 --> 00:18:12.559 You can you can be a human resources worker and make a creative on boarding 268 00:18:12.559 --> 00:18:17.640 process for a new employees at a large company. You can work at a 269 00:18:17.759 --> 00:18:22.839 sendich shop and make clearly creative compositions with your art, which is sentiist. 270 00:18:23.079 --> 00:18:27.880 So yeah, it's and that's the thing about your parts that there's show that 271 00:18:27.880 --> 00:18:32.119 as less creating daily. You can create daily, just because it's not a 272 00:18:32.160 --> 00:18:36.279 masterpieces of me that you're not creating something. Yeah, I love that and 273 00:18:36.319 --> 00:18:37.839 I love that you brought that up because I think a lot of people you 274 00:18:37.880 --> 00:18:44.200 know who, and I know people who are creators in the sense of like 275 00:18:44.359 --> 00:18:47.400 the popular term that we live in and the world we live in right now, 276 00:18:47.559 --> 00:18:51.559 just being a podcaster or an artist or graphic designer, a live streamer 277 00:18:51.640 --> 00:18:55.960 or whatever. People go well, they do that, but then they also 278 00:18:55.960 --> 00:18:59.160 have this Ninneto five job, but they're like, I'm not really a creator 279 00:18:59.200 --> 00:19:00.319 because I'm working on hundred twent five, like I know you are. You 280 00:19:00.359 --> 00:19:04.279 are creator, like you're you're going home and you're making stuff and you're a 281 00:19:04.319 --> 00:19:08.599 painter and you're an artist, and so I know a lot of people who 282 00:19:08.640 --> 00:19:15.240 don't think that they're creators, but they're doing such creative things and making furniture 283 00:19:15.240 --> 00:19:18.119 and do painting their house. I mean like that to me is a creative 284 00:19:18.160 --> 00:19:22.559 thing, to pick out paint colors and make everything match, like it's very 285 00:19:22.599 --> 00:19:25.279 creative, you know. So it's like. So I think for people listening 286 00:19:25.400 --> 00:19:27.599 or watching, it's like it's really, you know, important for you. 287 00:19:27.680 --> 00:19:32.640 If you're stuck on this this. Am I creator? Am I not? 288 00:19:33.039 --> 00:19:37.039 I would just throw this you know, yes or no out the window in 289 00:19:37.119 --> 00:19:40.400 just say everyone is a creator to some extent. I mean I feel like 290 00:19:40.440 --> 00:19:45.079 that's pretty fair. So let's go through the process of how do you learn 291 00:19:45.119 --> 00:19:49.680 how to create? Because I'm a creator in the sense of problem solving, 292 00:19:49.799 --> 00:19:55.640 thinking about, you know, ways to get technology and things to work together. 293 00:19:55.920 --> 00:19:59.039 I don't feel like I'm a creator in the sense of I'm the guy 294 00:19:59.079 --> 00:20:02.839 that's going to innovate the next road cast pro competition, you know what I 295 00:20:02.920 --> 00:20:07.839 mean. So, but do you feel like people can do that or is 296 00:20:07.839 --> 00:20:10.359 it, like you know, like I have, and I'm trying to frame 297 00:20:10.400 --> 00:20:14.200 this up the right way and maybe you know bring it together. Is I 298 00:20:14.240 --> 00:20:17.200 have friends of mine, their athletes and they, you're just like, from 299 00:20:17.240 --> 00:20:19.880 the time they were able to walk, like super athletes, and then I'm 300 00:20:19.880 --> 00:20:22.039 just like man, they're so great at it. But for me, if 301 00:20:22.079 --> 00:20:26.000 I want to be an athlete, I gotta like work my tail off to 302 00:20:26.079 --> 00:20:30.079 figure that out. You feel like that's the same thing for creative people and 303 00:20:30.240 --> 00:20:37.079 graphic designers and podcasters, since you'll kind of stay in our lanes here? 304 00:20:37.319 --> 00:20:40.720 Well, I think there's a series of skills that you need to learn. 305 00:20:40.759 --> 00:20:48.240 There is a learning curve, a process of this learning skills to become a 306 00:20:48.359 --> 00:20:55.079 certain thing, figuring out your niche. It's a whole process to become a, 307 00:20:56.039 --> 00:21:00.799 let's call it, a certified creative and then there is the question, 308 00:21:00.960 --> 00:21:03.599 is somebody paying you for it? Then that's also a key question. If 309 00:21:03.599 --> 00:21:08.240 somebody, I think you know what, let you put it this way. 310 00:21:10.160 --> 00:21:15.119 You're a dad, right, Yep, you have a really adorable son. 311 00:21:15.119 --> 00:21:18.680 I love when you post about Im on instagram because I think he's hilarious. 312 00:21:19.400 --> 00:21:22.839 You're a dad where you're also so many other things. You are also a 313 00:21:22.920 --> 00:21:26.680 husband, you also have friends, so you're also friend. You are somebody's 314 00:21:26.799 --> 00:21:29.799 kid, yours, maybe, you have said. I don't know you have 315 00:21:29.880 --> 00:21:33.200 seen this, but you're so many things and being a creator is one of 316 00:21:33.279 --> 00:21:38.880 them. MMM, Stadley, in society I think that we're told that you 317 00:21:38.880 --> 00:21:44.400 don't put all your eggs in the creative basket, then you're not a creative 318 00:21:45.079 --> 00:21:48.519 wow. But being a creative yeah, it's a part of so many things, 319 00:21:48.519 --> 00:21:53.440 like we're's as such a collection of experiences and things. And if you 320 00:21:53.519 --> 00:21:57.079 can make being creative the main part of your life, making your job, 321 00:21:57.119 --> 00:22:03.000 because also society makes us identify with our jobs, it's you don't say I 322 00:22:03.079 --> 00:22:07.319 work in medicine, you say I'm a doctor. You don't say I work 323 00:22:07.359 --> 00:22:11.599 in graphic design, you say I am a graphic designer. And if you 324 00:22:11.640 --> 00:22:15.319 say I work in it's home. It sounds almost like your list committed to 325 00:22:15.359 --> 00:22:18.440 it if you're not giving it a hundred and ten percent, because you say 326 00:22:18.519 --> 00:22:22.839 I work in yeah, and but we don't. We don't think about that 327 00:22:22.000 --> 00:22:26.000 in other ways. We don't say I mean if you don't tell me Your 328 00:22:26.039 --> 00:22:27.640 Dad, doesn't mean. The real lesson bad because you didn't mention it one 329 00:22:27.680 --> 00:22:30.400 conversation that you're a dad. You're still at that, you still do all 330 00:22:30.400 --> 00:22:34.680 those things and you're still a combination of all these objects. So, in 331 00:22:34.720 --> 00:22:38.000 the sense of being a graphic designer, there are a set of skills that 332 00:22:38.079 --> 00:22:42.440 you can learn, and that's what education is for, teaching you skills, 333 00:22:42.440 --> 00:22:47.599 helping you find your path, helping you find what parts of graphic design you 334 00:22:47.640 --> 00:22:51.880 like. Like. I personally don't like making logos. I am a rare 335 00:22:52.000 --> 00:22:56.359 breed of graphic designer who doesn't like making logos. I just don't enjoy it. 336 00:22:56.440 --> 00:23:00.400 There are other people, and shout out to made by James. James 337 00:23:00.480 --> 00:23:03.279 loves making logos and I all one of his books and he's so passionate about 338 00:23:03.279 --> 00:23:08.039 it and you you can read his passion in his text about how meticulous it 339 00:23:08.200 --> 00:23:15.440 is, how everything is precise. I have friends who can spend a year 340 00:23:15.240 --> 00:23:18.960 working on a book, not on the content of the book but a how 341 00:23:19.039 --> 00:23:22.720 every page will be designed, and you see, you feel it, you 342 00:23:22.920 --> 00:23:26.279 you look at something and you feel there's a level of care here. Wow 343 00:23:26.400 --> 00:23:32.319 that this person has to me. My Passion in creating is in talking to 344 00:23:32.400 --> 00:23:36.720 people, in figuring out what their problem is, what their needs are, 345 00:23:36.759 --> 00:23:41.759 and how I can use creative ways of solving their problem. Maybe there is 346 00:23:41.839 --> 00:23:47.359 the solution will be a graphic design solution. Maybe the solution won't be a 347 00:23:47.400 --> 00:23:52.480 graphic design solution and I'll need to resort to other creatives that are more skillful 348 00:23:52.519 --> 00:23:56.200 than I am. So that's also a creative process of being like, why 349 00:23:56.279 --> 00:24:00.440 do I have available right now for me? My resource says yeah, and 350 00:24:00.519 --> 00:24:04.039 with taking it to podcasting, people, Hey, editing. Some people are 351 00:24:04.160 --> 00:24:08.559 genius, isn't at editing. So people life like doing the interview, some 352 00:24:08.640 --> 00:24:14.359 people hate doing interviews. That's also things for people just like having monolog podcast 353 00:24:14.400 --> 00:24:17.519 they which they talk to themselves, which I think it's great. Yeah, 354 00:24:17.839 --> 00:24:22.680 yeah, I like can I have a friend always it will. One thing 355 00:24:22.680 --> 00:24:26.160 I want to just podcast. He describe chokes. You know. One thing 356 00:24:26.200 --> 00:24:29.039 I want to jump in here real quick, and and I think it's really 357 00:24:29.079 --> 00:24:32.480 important that we kind of highlight this a little bit, is our society has 358 00:24:32.519 --> 00:24:37.319 really taught us to go through school, and I you know in the states 359 00:24:37.319 --> 00:24:41.799 anyway, it's go through K, through twelve and then but by time you 360 00:24:41.839 --> 00:24:44.799 get to like halfway through, like in sixth grade or seventh grade. You 361 00:24:44.799 --> 00:24:48.039 gotta like really figure out what it is you want to do for the rest 362 00:24:48.079 --> 00:24:49.720 of your life. Is like a twelve year old or thirteen or fourteen year 363 00:24:49.720 --> 00:24:52.440 old. You're like you're like what am I do? You know, I 364 00:24:52.440 --> 00:24:56.200 remember thinking this Mi in like seventh grade. They're like what do you want 365 00:24:56.200 --> 00:24:57.799 to do for college? My Dude, I literally just figured out how do 366 00:24:57.839 --> 00:25:02.720 I my own ass, like I literally did like I'm probably just now getting 367 00:25:02.799 --> 00:25:04.480 good at that. So I don't know what I want to do for the 368 00:25:04.519 --> 00:25:10.279 rest of my life. Like this is insane. And so, you know, 369 00:25:10.319 --> 00:25:12.839 I think so many times we put that pressure on and we have these 370 00:25:12.960 --> 00:25:19.640 career you know, this career minded like you know society that goes like you're 371 00:25:19.640 --> 00:25:22.480 gonna be you got to be this and you got to be it for the 372 00:25:22.519 --> 00:25:25.720 rest of your life. I've been a lot of things in my S. 373 00:25:25.799 --> 00:25:29.400 I've been a lot of things in my s and one thing that I've not 374 00:25:29.480 --> 00:25:33.000 been in is a career anything. Like I've been a career like creative. 375 00:25:33.079 --> 00:25:36.680 I've stayed in the creative feel for the most part my whole entire life, 376 00:25:36.720 --> 00:25:38.559 but I've done different things. I own a T shirt business, I've owned 377 00:25:38.559 --> 00:25:42.359 media stuff. I've done, you know, podcasting and websites and done a 378 00:25:42.400 --> 00:25:45.880 little graphic design and all this kind of stuff, and I've stayed in that 379 00:25:45.960 --> 00:25:51.400 lane of creativity. But I was never really sold on like I'm going to 380 00:25:51.480 --> 00:25:55.799 go do one thing for thirty years because, much like what you said, 381 00:25:55.839 --> 00:26:00.759 I feel like I am a multi person, multiiphen creator, and sometimes it 382 00:26:00.759 --> 00:26:04.240 takes experimenting to figure out how something works. You know, it's like people 383 00:26:04.240 --> 00:26:08.240 who develop product take a long time to develop that product, to figure out 384 00:26:08.279 --> 00:26:15.160 how stuff goes together and works and communicates and to launch it to the market. 385 00:26:15.200 --> 00:26:18.319 But yet we're supposed to figure it out and, you know, three 386 00:26:18.319 --> 00:26:22.960 to four years after after our main school and and then like okay, now 387 00:26:22.000 --> 00:26:25.200 you got to go do this for the rest of your life. I'm like 388 00:26:25.559 --> 00:26:29.279 that's so unfair, and so I don't think people should go to college until 389 00:26:29.519 --> 00:26:32.400 after they're like twenty five. Honestly, like, if you want to go 390 00:26:32.480 --> 00:26:34.839 to college, like go do a bunch of crap between twenty and twenty five 391 00:26:34.960 --> 00:26:38.960 or eighteen and twenty five, and then go to college and then figure it 392 00:26:38.960 --> 00:26:42.799 out, like because go dabble and stuff, like go be, go work, 393 00:26:42.880 --> 00:26:45.759 for free for somebody for a couple of years. Go Work for free 394 00:26:45.799 --> 00:26:51.720 for a graphic designer and eat crap and live on your couch and do whatever 395 00:26:51.759 --> 00:26:53.960 and see if you like that skill, because we were wasting so much money 396 00:26:55.000 --> 00:26:59.720 and time, in my opinion, doing stuff that we hate. So I'm 397 00:27:00.160 --> 00:27:02.359 that you. I get a little rabbit trail there. I Apologize, like 398 00:27:02.319 --> 00:27:04.759 I don't a rant, but we do lean too heavy on that and I'm 399 00:27:04.799 --> 00:27:08.160 glad you brought that up because that was one of my questions for you. 400 00:27:10.160 --> 00:27:12.640 I get on my soapbox about bad on the podcast, like I think on 401 00:27:12.759 --> 00:27:17.880 every episode. I'd say how unfair it is to ask an eighteen year old 402 00:27:18.559 --> 00:27:21.200 what do you want to do with the rest of your life, because, 403 00:27:22.559 --> 00:27:26.160 I mean I know eighteen year old to have had the life experience of a 404 00:27:26.240 --> 00:27:30.200 thirty year old, a regular third year old, because life just didn't treat 405 00:27:30.240 --> 00:27:33.839 them as well. They just got got dealt curve. Also, they shouldn't 406 00:27:33.839 --> 00:27:38.039 have been built with and they can do it, but thank God is not 407 00:27:38.079 --> 00:27:44.279 the majority. The majority still figuring out what they want to do in their 408 00:27:44.279 --> 00:27:48.279 life or worse, we ask these we ask them in your olds. Oh, 409 00:27:48.599 --> 00:27:52.680 if I kid shows that they like legos. Are you're going to work 410 00:27:52.720 --> 00:27:59.039 in construction? Their kids? They have a favorite dinosaur still. I still 411 00:27:59.079 --> 00:28:03.680 have a favorite dinosaur today, and that's why I was see that be creative 412 00:28:03.720 --> 00:28:06.960 about your own life. Be Creative all the things that you want to do. 413 00:28:07.240 --> 00:28:11.000 And I you have no idea how many people I know that went to 414 00:28:11.079 --> 00:28:17.480 college and chose a random thing they chose. You ask them, like they 415 00:28:17.559 --> 00:28:22.119 love themorica. The most common one is business administration. It's like, Oh, 416 00:28:22.119 --> 00:28:23.359 so you want to be in business? I don't know. I had 417 00:28:23.400 --> 00:28:29.519 to study something and I chose Business Administration because it looked pretty broad. And 418 00:28:30.440 --> 00:28:33.599 then they don't know what they want to do after they graduate. They have 419 00:28:33.759 --> 00:28:37.920 these crisis they in the US and a lot of Americas. So they get 420 00:28:37.920 --> 00:28:42.680 they exit college and an insane amount of dead, not knowing if they even 421 00:28:42.799 --> 00:28:48.680 like the thing that they studied and asking, what the hell am I going 422 00:28:48.720 --> 00:28:51.160 to do for the rest of my life? Like what I have, this 423 00:28:51.240 --> 00:28:52.960 degree, what do I do with it? I mean their degrees you should 424 00:28:53.000 --> 00:28:56.000 have. I mean, if you're going to be a doctor, please go 425 00:28:56.039 --> 00:28:59.359 to medical school, like, I don't yeah, if you're going to be 426 00:28:59.400 --> 00:29:02.599 a lawyer, I think you should know the law. If you if you 427 00:29:02.720 --> 00:29:06.759 want to, I don't know, be anything want. And also, we 428 00:29:06.799 --> 00:29:11.680 can change our minds. It's okay, I don't know. I don't like. 429 00:29:11.799 --> 00:29:15.039 I remember when I decided when I when I started university, like my 430 00:29:15.119 --> 00:29:19.480 official university degree, I was twenty six and my classmates were in their early 431 00:29:19.519 --> 00:29:26.200 to in their like eighteen, nineteen, up to twenty three maybe, and 432 00:29:26.240 --> 00:29:30.079 they were like, Oh my God, like when I'm your age, I 433 00:29:30.079 --> 00:29:33.319 want to be married with kids, and I'm like, I will lend you 434 00:29:33.400 --> 00:29:37.680 my two year old nephew for a day and then you tell me you when 435 00:29:37.680 --> 00:29:42.519 I have kids now, because they're they're there. It's a lot and I 436 00:29:42.559 --> 00:29:48.880 appreciate parents so much. It's like that's a y'all are super people. Honestly, 437 00:29:48.960 --> 00:29:52.039 I don't. I can barely find myself right now. But yeah, 438 00:29:52.119 --> 00:29:56.319 be creative about your own life. Allow yourself to change your mind if and 439 00:29:56.680 --> 00:30:02.119 they're also so many things we always look down and doing things in the side 440 00:30:03.400 --> 00:30:06.039 like, okay, you have to your Nuneto five job and you don't want 441 00:30:06.039 --> 00:30:11.599 to fully commit to this other thing. Maybe you can't. Maybe you cannot 442 00:30:11.680 --> 00:30:14.839 fully commit. The weak. How do I say this? Noy that I 443 00:30:14.880 --> 00:30:22.920 don't sign arrogant or stupid. A lot of people in this world have responsibilities 444 00:30:22.920 --> 00:30:30.079 that keep them from plunging into a creative career. MMM, for we always 445 00:30:30.160 --> 00:30:36.960 that there is this ted talk about friend carry carry something, but if you 446 00:30:36.960 --> 00:30:38.400 look at it, it's like follow your passion. That the talk is about 447 00:30:38.400 --> 00:30:45.240 passion and she talks about we always say like follow your passion, follow your 448 00:30:45.279 --> 00:30:49.000 passion, and she says this example about the person who how that idea is 449 00:30:49.079 --> 00:30:52.599 kind of the least and I think it is, because then you look at 450 00:30:52.599 --> 00:30:59.640 people who clean glass, people who sweep streets, people who work medial jobs, 451 00:30:59.759 --> 00:31:02.000 who work in the trades, and say think they have no passion, 452 00:31:02.119 --> 00:31:07.279 like because that job is not passionate. Maybe their passion is keeping their family 453 00:31:07.359 --> 00:31:11.000 fed. Yeah, maybe their passion is not being homeless. Maybe their passion 454 00:31:11.359 --> 00:31:15.200 is really their creatives at home, but they need to keep the lights on 455 00:31:15.240 --> 00:31:22.480 our their house. Like, why do we associate making money with being creative 456 00:31:22.519 --> 00:31:26.680 when you can be creative without making money and having an eight to five that 457 00:31:26.839 --> 00:31:32.559 pays your bills? That is such your concert for me. And Yeah, 458 00:31:32.559 --> 00:31:36.440 and I agree a hundred percent. I think sometimes on either side of the 459 00:31:36.440 --> 00:31:40.119 fence right if you're if you're a if you're a creator or an entrepreneur, 460 00:31:40.160 --> 00:31:42.200 and I'll just say entrepreneur, maybe their covers. You know, people work 461 00:31:42.240 --> 00:31:45.559 for themselves. But you know sometimes as an entrepreneur, if we're not careful, 462 00:31:45.599 --> 00:31:48.559 we can be like, oh, I can't believe somebody works nine to 463 00:31:48.680 --> 00:31:51.559 five. And then sometimes if somebody works, you know, nine to five 464 00:31:51.640 --> 00:31:55.079 job, they got the salary, they get the benefits, they get the 465 00:31:55.079 --> 00:31:57.720 whole package, they go home to their, you know, their two kids 466 00:31:57.759 --> 00:32:01.559 and their picket fence, and then they look at creatives and entrepreneurs and they 467 00:32:01.559 --> 00:32:05.039 go, my Gosh, I can't, but how do you live that way? 468 00:32:05.599 --> 00:32:08.400 But I always just say, like, you know, it doesn't either 469 00:32:08.519 --> 00:32:12.000 one is fine, like I don't you know, for you. I don't 470 00:32:12.039 --> 00:32:15.480 feel like I can. Through my entrepreneurship journey I've been both. I've been 471 00:32:15.480 --> 00:32:20.640 working as an entrepreneur and stuff is just not working out in sales or not 472 00:32:20.680 --> 00:32:23.319 coming in in you know, when I was in the tshirt business and doing 473 00:32:23.359 --> 00:32:25.400 that and I'm like cool, I'm going to go work for somebody else, 474 00:32:25.759 --> 00:32:29.799 and I went and I went and worked for a smoothie shop because I thought 475 00:32:29.839 --> 00:32:31.440 maybe I'd be interested in making a smoothie shop. You know, maybe I 476 00:32:31.440 --> 00:32:35.440 didn't be interested in owning one. So I went and worked at a smoothie 477 00:32:35.440 --> 00:32:38.680 shop for a while. Learned a ton about franchises, learning ton about opening 478 00:32:38.720 --> 00:32:43.240 up stores, learn a ton about all that stuff, and so now I'm 479 00:32:43.279 --> 00:32:46.599 just more equipped as a business owner, as an entrepreneur, as you know, 480 00:32:46.720 --> 00:32:51.480 business scales or whatever we want to call it, that I have all 481 00:32:51.519 --> 00:32:53.240 these tools in my tool bag to go cool. I think I have some 482 00:32:53.359 --> 00:32:57.519 ideas of how to do this. So you know, if you're listening or 483 00:32:57.559 --> 00:33:02.759 you're watching, don't don't just take for granted that nine to five job or 484 00:33:02.799 --> 00:33:07.720 the job that you're transitioning into something else. Like figure out what it is 485 00:33:07.759 --> 00:33:10.000 you can take from. There's a you know, lessons learned or you know, 486 00:33:10.039 --> 00:33:13.359 maybe you learn how to manage something, maybe you learn how to manage 487 00:33:13.400 --> 00:33:16.000 books or schedules or whatever. I mean, I don't know how to do 488 00:33:16.039 --> 00:33:20.960 something faster, like I figured out in that smoothie job. But like literally 489 00:33:21.039 --> 00:33:24.359 got recognized for like coming up with a strategy to sell more peanut butter than 490 00:33:24.400 --> 00:33:29.119 any other store in the franchise. I'm like, cool, it's like. 491 00:33:29.319 --> 00:33:32.079 I don't know, but but it got me think about sales differently. You 492 00:33:32.160 --> 00:33:36.359 know, I just got me thinking different. So so don't think you know 493 00:33:36.440 --> 00:33:38.680 it on either side of the fence. Like it's really important that we support 494 00:33:38.680 --> 00:33:42.480 each other's people and not say, well, I'm better than you because I 495 00:33:42.519 --> 00:33:45.119 don't go to work, because I don't have to go work for somebody else, 496 00:33:45.240 --> 00:33:46.880 or I'm better than you because I got a steady pay check and I 497 00:33:46.880 --> 00:33:50.519 don't have to, you know, worry about I think we like just be 498 00:33:50.559 --> 00:33:53.720 happy for one another and support each other in that, because I think our 499 00:33:54.000 --> 00:33:58.240 system in the world has just said like, if you don't do a, 500 00:33:58.240 --> 00:34:00.480 B and C, indeed, then your failure, and I just don't think 501 00:34:00.519 --> 00:34:06.000 it's true. I think it's way more gray area than black and white, 502 00:34:06.039 --> 00:34:13.440 in my opinion, especially from a creative perspective. So totally and how you 503 00:34:13.519 --> 00:34:21.440 compire your life knowledge and your experiences and you remix them into something new that 504 00:34:21.559 --> 00:34:28.639 is also creative, that is also creative thinking that it is absorbing and learning 505 00:34:28.679 --> 00:34:31.079 and we're all like seems, were born, we survived because we're curious. 506 00:34:31.079 --> 00:34:36.079 We developed as people, as a race, as a humanity, as a 507 00:34:36.079 --> 00:34:39.719 society, because we were curious from the beginning because somebody said, Huh, 508 00:34:39.880 --> 00:34:45.559 what if I lick that? What will happen? I always wanted this question, 509 00:34:45.599 --> 00:34:50.239 like who just walked out into a field and grabbed off this fruit and 510 00:34:50.320 --> 00:34:52.280 just ate it? Like how weird is that? Like I always think about 511 00:34:52.280 --> 00:34:55.719 the our pricemen. Way Too much time thinking about who was that person and 512 00:34:55.800 --> 00:35:00.360 what were they like? You know what? Yeah, her like who looked 513 00:35:00.360 --> 00:35:06.559 at pikes feet and said I'm gonna eat this? Probably the person that was 514 00:35:06.639 --> 00:35:09.000 so said they're so hungry. They're like, I gotta eat this whole thing 515 00:35:09.039 --> 00:35:15.760 because I'm just starving. Yeah, yeah, it's that. That's that's the 516 00:35:15.840 --> 00:35:19.199 things. Like people. We always like say that this is the type of 517 00:35:19.239 --> 00:35:22.800 creativity, that this time is like the we're right now living in the hypocreativity. 518 00:35:22.840 --> 00:35:28.800 I don't think we are. I think the Dark Ages, prey history, 519 00:35:29.400 --> 00:35:31.360 like give more way more creatively for because they had to be, because 520 00:35:31.679 --> 00:35:36.440 it's like I'm either created for I die. It's one of there the other. 521 00:35:36.960 --> 00:35:42.280 We survived. The creativity and curiosity were key parts of survival. Yeah, 522 00:35:42.320 --> 00:35:46.800 exactly. And there there is there is this guys Stewart Williams. He 523 00:35:46.880 --> 00:35:51.599 works on some time. I met him and clubhouse. Great Guy. I 524 00:35:51.639 --> 00:35:52.880 wish I could go to the US and take a course with him because it 525 00:35:53.039 --> 00:35:57.679 very interesting and he has this phrase that I always impacted me, though. 526 00:35:57.719 --> 00:36:02.119 We always look down and poor people and think that they are dumb and that 527 00:36:02.159 --> 00:36:07.280 they don't have the skills, but the truth is that poor people are the 528 00:36:07.320 --> 00:36:12.679 most creative and entrepreneurial people that there is because they survive, because for them 529 00:36:12.719 --> 00:36:15.760 being creative it is survival. Figuring out how I'm going to make these ten 530 00:36:15.880 --> 00:36:20.360 dollars a day last to me. How am I gonna feed my family with 531 00:36:20.920 --> 00:36:24.599 this that I could gather from scratch jobs and from scratching money on the street? 532 00:36:24.760 --> 00:36:31.159 And they figure it out because they're creative. It's a thing called survival. 533 00:36:31.800 --> 00:36:36.360 And then some of us that strielage about get to be creative, as 534 00:36:36.519 --> 00:36:38.800 I'M gonna at least sign this fun model, I'm gonna make this video and 535 00:36:39.280 --> 00:36:43.519 so on, and we're lucky and we're blessed that we can be creative for 536 00:36:43.559 --> 00:36:49.159 the sake of being creative, but for creativity. Everybody knows that. Everybody 537 00:36:49.239 --> 00:36:53.159 learns. It's about on clogging it, it's about on learning certain things, 538 00:36:53.199 --> 00:36:59.000 on learning that if you don't do it for a living, it's a valid 539 00:36:59.239 --> 00:37:04.239 on learning that there is a good creativity and a bad creativity, on learning 540 00:37:04.280 --> 00:37:08.519 that this mental blockages of imposter syndrome, like we all like. We say 541 00:37:08.599 --> 00:37:13.519 that posters imposter syndrome. It's only for creatives. No, it's for everybody. 542 00:37:13.679 --> 00:37:21.440 It's because we have the expectations of ourselves. Like athletes can get imposter 543 00:37:21.559 --> 00:37:24.760 syndrome, peep, like human people in any job can get. I am 544 00:37:24.800 --> 00:37:29.599 I really that good? Am I getting this compliment because I actually deserve it, 545 00:37:29.800 --> 00:37:31.880 or did I do a good job? What's this thing that I made? 546 00:37:31.880 --> 00:37:38.000 Actually good? What? And in the case of creatives, it really 547 00:37:38.039 --> 00:37:43.840 closs us. It really I don't want to say constipate us, because that 548 00:37:43.960 --> 00:37:47.679 has to do with Poop, but I cannot think I'm another word. It 549 00:37:47.719 --> 00:37:52.360 makes us creal to be constantated. Yeah, I think you're right, you 550 00:37:52.360 --> 00:37:55.519 know, and it's interesting too, because I think you know, like one, 551 00:37:55.760 --> 00:37:59.199 I love these, said that that we all do with imposter syndrome, 552 00:37:59.280 --> 00:38:01.840 even if it is the job that doesn't seem creative, or somebody offers of 553 00:38:01.960 --> 00:38:06.400 some promotion, like Oh, did we are? Do we deserve this? 554 00:38:06.400 --> 00:38:08.239 Can we do the job and my the right person. You know. I 555 00:38:08.239 --> 00:38:10.800 mean I've dealt with this my whole entire life, and but one thing I 556 00:38:10.840 --> 00:38:16.079 think you said that you nailed it, is managing expectations. This is something 557 00:38:16.119 --> 00:38:22.119 that my wife and I talk a lot about, is in really for ourselves, 558 00:38:22.159 --> 00:38:25.760 but then also a lot of people around us, because oftentimes we are 559 00:38:27.000 --> 00:38:30.360 kind of, you know, steered in one direction or the other based on 560 00:38:30.480 --> 00:38:35.199 the things that that we think, the false expectations that we put on others 561 00:38:35.320 --> 00:38:38.239 for us, if that makes any sense. So we're like expecting that they 562 00:38:38.280 --> 00:38:45.559 have expectations for us to solve their expectation. That whatever. Yeah, it's 563 00:38:45.639 --> 00:38:50.119 very Meta and this is like it's very Meta and it keeps US trapped, 564 00:38:50.159 --> 00:38:52.760 and I know I've been in that situation. So so is this what I 565 00:38:52.800 --> 00:39:00.280 mean? Tell me that you know something that you've done to change your like 566 00:39:00.559 --> 00:39:05.039 the holding on this of expectations, because I think this is a powerful thing 567 00:39:05.079 --> 00:39:07.440 if people can, and I can't even put into words, but I think 568 00:39:07.480 --> 00:39:13.800 if people can break this expectations and allowing other people's either true or false expectations 569 00:39:13.840 --> 00:39:16.519 of them control them, they'll go to another level in their creativity. So 570 00:39:16.599 --> 00:39:20.039 how are you able to do that or how do you do that on a 571 00:39:20.119 --> 00:39:24.840 daily basis? I guess, well, for me, that those gets harder 572 00:39:24.880 --> 00:39:30.639 because as creatives, one over the creative things, we look at things in 573 00:39:30.679 --> 00:39:34.320 the middle because we're part of the entire process. We are pre see it 574 00:39:34.400 --> 00:39:38.559 from conception. We expect things to turn out a certain way. Then we 575 00:39:38.639 --> 00:39:42.840 make it halfway through. Any doesn't look like that and we start freaking out 576 00:39:42.760 --> 00:39:46.280 and it's like, why doesn't it look better? Why is in this working? 577 00:39:46.719 --> 00:39:50.960 And then we stop. Then this is the point when we say we 578 00:39:50.960 --> 00:39:53.159 stopped. It's like this is not good enough, this is garbage, this 579 00:39:53.239 --> 00:39:58.280 makes no sense, it's nothing how I thought it would be. And then 580 00:39:58.320 --> 00:40:01.519 we stopped. Be unblocked. So when I get in those moments, I 581 00:40:01.559 --> 00:40:09.559 always tell myself a surgery halfway through is a murder. Oh Wow, all 582 00:40:09.679 --> 00:40:14.320 right, certain there's a murder. Yeah, okay, if you think about 583 00:40:14.320 --> 00:40:17.119 it, it's surgery, it's opening a human being and if you're looking, 584 00:40:17.199 --> 00:40:22.960 if you just walk into it halfway through, it's technical murder. It's at 585 00:40:23.039 --> 00:40:28.639 least assault. Yeah, but then when you make it to the end, 586 00:40:28.960 --> 00:40:35.039 is this amazing life saving process. So my recommendation to people would be. 587 00:40:35.159 --> 00:40:42.199 Divide your expectations, break them down into little ones. What is exactly, 588 00:40:42.320 --> 00:40:45.559 if you have this again, concept breaking down into little things that you can 589 00:40:45.599 --> 00:40:51.199 stay motivated about. Make little goals. So if you let's say you're making 590 00:40:51.239 --> 00:40:54.760 a podcast. So let's say you're making a podcast episode and it's going to 591 00:40:54.840 --> 00:41:00.199 be two hours, break it down into little parts, like what are the 592 00:41:01.199 --> 00:41:07.599 less it's minimum, but minimum viable product. MMM, like the MVP for 593 00:41:07.719 --> 00:41:10.719 in your making an APP, like what is the minimal thing you need to 594 00:41:10.760 --> 00:41:15.199 achieve to feel like you achieve something? And then you jump from that goal 595 00:41:15.280 --> 00:41:17.039 to the next one and then, Huh, I can do this, this 596 00:41:17.159 --> 00:41:22.360 is tiny and easy. I did it. Okay, I'm going to jump 597 00:41:22.360 --> 00:41:25.440 from here to the next one. So give yourself those little those little stairs, 598 00:41:25.440 --> 00:41:29.639 like make the stairs as little as possible so you can jump off them 599 00:41:29.679 --> 00:41:32.199 and that will give you impose for the next one, because maybe something you 600 00:41:32.239 --> 00:41:39.280 thought would take you two hours actually took you ten minutes because probably an hour 601 00:41:39.360 --> 00:41:43.239 and a half you were going to be doubting yourself. And then you're going 602 00:41:43.280 --> 00:41:45.079 to go to twenty minutes of Planning and I you have ten minutes left and 603 00:41:45.079 --> 00:41:49.320 then that's a ten minutes. You're going to do the thing. So if 604 00:41:49.360 --> 00:41:52.400 you break it down to little achievable goals, it would make it a lot 605 00:41:52.440 --> 00:41:55.519 easier, because you have constantly been achieving things. You have been like, 606 00:41:55.559 --> 00:42:00.199 Oh, my goal was to gather materials and I found all this materials. 607 00:42:00.400 --> 00:42:04.920 Yeah, me, and go onto the net, but don't stop. I 608 00:42:04.960 --> 00:42:09.119 think it's like I started doing cross for like three months, like three months 609 00:42:09.119 --> 00:42:13.920 ago, and what my coach comes telling me. It's like don't stop. 610 00:42:13.920 --> 00:42:15.599 Whatever you do, go slower if you have to. Put don't stop, 611 00:42:15.639 --> 00:42:19.960 because when you stop you start we're thinking. You start thinking, can I 612 00:42:20.000 --> 00:42:22.400 do this? Can I do this? Can I do this? I just 613 00:42:22.719 --> 00:42:28.079 I just did my first box jump last week, ever, and it was 614 00:42:28.159 --> 00:42:30.760 that thing that I could do it. He could see that I could do 615 00:42:30.800 --> 00:42:34.480 it. I thought that maybe I could, but that's what I was thinking 616 00:42:34.480 --> 00:42:35.960 about it. He was I don't think about it, just do it, 617 00:42:35.960 --> 00:42:37.599 don't think about it, and I tripped a couple times. Then when I 618 00:42:37.599 --> 00:42:39.320 made the first one, I was like yeah, I can do this. 619 00:42:39.480 --> 00:42:45.000 So the second one was easier and then when he got harder, he just 620 00:42:45.039 --> 00:42:50.480 told me don't stop, just keep jumping, keep moving there is this movie 621 00:42:50.840 --> 00:42:53.800 robots. It's I think it's a pixar movie. They said no, it 622 00:42:53.840 --> 00:42:59.079 was one. I said no, it's not really it's keep up with the 623 00:42:59.159 --> 00:43:02.239 Robinson's. Maybe it's about this kid that goes to the future and the whole 624 00:43:02.280 --> 00:43:07.400 moral of the stories keep moving forward. Just keep moving forward, just keep 625 00:43:07.440 --> 00:43:10.079 making and if you get lost in the process, just keep just make something 626 00:43:10.199 --> 00:43:16.119 simple, make something easy, and just remind yourself because by creating new things, 627 00:43:16.119 --> 00:43:21.039 maybe it's a doodle on a post it, that has nothing to do 628 00:43:21.079 --> 00:43:22.599 with your project, but you did a thing and that it's going to propel 629 00:43:22.639 --> 00:43:28.320 you to the next one's going to get you out of that loop of can 630 00:43:28.360 --> 00:43:31.159 I actually make something? Yeah, you made a doodle on a post it, 631 00:43:31.719 --> 00:43:36.800 yes, you did. Yeah, I love this. I love this 632 00:43:36.840 --> 00:43:40.599 process because I'm that person who my whole life I've I've been somewhat of a 633 00:43:40.599 --> 00:43:45.119 perfectionist. If something, I'll put it this way, something has instructions and 634 00:43:45.119 --> 00:43:47.800 I follow the instructions and I don't get the result that it says that, 635 00:43:47.880 --> 00:43:53.920 I'm very irritated and so I've had to like and then my wife is the 636 00:43:53.920 --> 00:44:00.039 other option. She's the opposite side. She is like instructions. Nobody needs 637 00:44:00.039 --> 00:44:02.960 it. Will figure it out, and she typically does, but she might 638 00:44:04.079 --> 00:44:07.519 build it wrong three times and I'm like, I don't want to build wrong 639 00:44:07.559 --> 00:44:08.320 three times, I want to build it right the first time. And their 640 00:44:08.320 --> 00:44:12.559 instruction should have been the correct instructions and they're not, and they're it. 641 00:44:12.800 --> 00:44:15.000 You know, and I just got down this whole rabbit trail of like why 642 00:44:15.000 --> 00:44:17.920 they shouldn't be making this children's toys of the worst, by the way. 643 00:44:19.679 --> 00:44:23.480 But I but I have been learning, even in my mid s now, 644 00:44:23.519 --> 00:44:30.079 to enjoy the process, even if it's tough, even if it doesn't make 645 00:44:30.119 --> 00:44:31.440 sense. And we've done a lot of crazy things and you know, you've 646 00:44:31.480 --> 00:44:36.519 moved, you've lived in different countries and you know that is a process in 647 00:44:36.559 --> 00:44:39.000 itself. And when we moved to Puerto Rico, it was like this mountain. 648 00:44:39.079 --> 00:44:42.800 And then once we moved here and we went through the process and we 649 00:44:43.039 --> 00:44:45.360 understood. Now I learned a lot. I learned about shipping dogs and learned 650 00:44:45.360 --> 00:44:50.079 about, you know, flying on the airplanes with toddler and, you know, 651 00:44:50.519 --> 00:44:52.480 packing a bunch of crap and for suitcase. Like I've learned how to 652 00:44:52.480 --> 00:44:57.039 do stuff, and so I think that is the you know, when you're 653 00:44:57.039 --> 00:44:59.800 when we're in this creative process, no matter what it is now, where 654 00:45:00.000 --> 00:45:02.880 a kind of job or whatever. You're right, like break this thing down, 655 00:45:02.880 --> 00:45:07.679 evenel ifant one by at a time, and in like celebrate those little 656 00:45:07.719 --> 00:45:12.360 micro wins, if you will, and I think that is something too, 657 00:45:12.400 --> 00:45:16.480 that we struggle with as people, is like celebrate yourself if you draw that 658 00:45:16.920 --> 00:45:21.519 little stick figure on the post and note because you want to become an artist, 659 00:45:21.559 --> 00:45:24.599 like celebrate that thing, you know, like, I don't know, 660 00:45:24.719 --> 00:45:28.719 put it posted on the Internet and cheer yourself on, like who knows? 661 00:45:28.760 --> 00:45:30.880 Like celebrate it, go have a beer and say, whoo, look what 662 00:45:30.960 --> 00:45:35.199 I did, and it makes you feel good. And what's you to do 663 00:45:35.239 --> 00:45:38.760 it again and again and again. So and same with podcasting. I mean 664 00:45:38.840 --> 00:45:45.880 I still record episodes and do live stream shows that are like just bombing. 665 00:45:45.079 --> 00:45:47.440 I just bomb them. Oh my God, I did a terrible job, 666 00:45:47.519 --> 00:45:51.039 blah, blah, but I learned from it and I move on and I 667 00:45:51.159 --> 00:45:54.119 keep going, and so I think that's I love that you said that, 668 00:45:54.199 --> 00:45:59.960 like break up those little expectations, get those little wins, celebrate yourself and 669 00:46:00.000 --> 00:46:02.800 continue to move on. So would you say that's one of your biggest lessons 670 00:46:02.920 --> 00:46:06.840 or or to kind of bring the show and kind of wrap it up, 671 00:46:06.920 --> 00:46:10.639 what would be like one of the biggest lessons that you've learned that maybe you 672 00:46:12.239 --> 00:46:15.920 carry it with you and every project that you do? What would that be? 673 00:46:17.039 --> 00:46:27.039 I think it is that things happened and you have the skills to handle 674 00:46:27.119 --> 00:46:30.760 whatever happens. I think with creative if we hold on, when we start 675 00:46:30.760 --> 00:46:35.519 with the concept of an idea, with a vision, and then we become 676 00:46:35.559 --> 00:46:42.920 so fixated in realizing this vision that we close ourselves to other ideas, other 677 00:46:43.239 --> 00:46:47.280 projects, and then when the vision doesn't come out the way we expected, 678 00:46:47.440 --> 00:46:52.320 then we're like, oh, I suck because I had an idea and I 679 00:46:52.360 --> 00:46:57.480 didn't realize that this is terrible. But the thing is that in that journey 680 00:46:57.519 --> 00:47:00.800 of creating, whatever it is you're creating, you're going to discover something new 681 00:47:00.880 --> 00:47:05.920 and you're going to learn something new and you're going to take that lesson into 682 00:47:05.960 --> 00:47:09.400 a nest and you create. Maybe, if you're making a cake, you're 683 00:47:09.440 --> 00:47:14.599 going to be like, Oh, maybe I don't have I don't have eggs. 684 00:47:14.960 --> 00:47:17.440 I am it's gonna suck, I should stop making this. Yeah, 685 00:47:17.480 --> 00:47:21.039 I mean in that case please go get the eggs, because the rest of 686 00:47:21.119 --> 00:47:23.599 you like if I there's something and I don't know much about baking, doesn't 687 00:47:23.599 --> 00:47:25.920 one thing. I know it's I you need to keep the ingredients right, 688 00:47:27.599 --> 00:47:30.760 but maybe you'll discover. Okay, I made this cake, I'm going to 689 00:47:30.880 --> 00:47:34.639 decorate it. Oh, maybe I never saw that I could decorate with fruits 690 00:47:34.679 --> 00:47:37.480 and I have heard in the fridge, so I just like pull froad and 691 00:47:37.519 --> 00:47:38.719 not just make bun at of bread or I don't know what. Basically, 692 00:47:38.760 --> 00:47:45.719 what I'm saying it's like be open to the process and allow yourself to keep 693 00:47:45.760 --> 00:47:47.880 your vision. Like, hold your vision, but don't hold it too tightly, 694 00:47:49.559 --> 00:47:52.960 because then you're limiting your own creative journey. If you decide, I 695 00:47:53.000 --> 00:47:59.960 am only going to paint with three colors, so like with blue, yellow 696 00:48:00.079 --> 00:48:02.719 and red, which are the basic colors, and sound. I'm only gonna 697 00:48:02.760 --> 00:48:07.639 paint with these three. Yeah, but at some point, willingly are willingly, 698 00:48:07.639 --> 00:48:09.320 they're going to mix and you're going to have oranges and you can have 699 00:48:09.360 --> 00:48:15.320 brains, you're gonna have purpose and you're going to have you started with three. 700 00:48:15.440 --> 00:48:17.639 Your plan was to have just three, but then maybe by accident they 701 00:48:17.719 --> 00:48:22.519 mixed up and suddenly you have all these colors that you never could imagine your 702 00:48:22.519 --> 00:48:25.960 pace would have and now they fit. Somehow they naturally fit. And that 703 00:48:27.039 --> 00:48:30.920 applies to business, like maybe you had this idea of a concept, but 704 00:48:31.039 --> 00:48:35.920 then turns out your market was something different or a variation of it that you 705 00:48:36.000 --> 00:48:38.320 never thought you would be in, but then suddenly, surprised you are. 706 00:48:38.679 --> 00:48:43.800 And that applies to so many things. And I just be open for things 707 00:48:43.840 --> 00:48:49.400 to happen and for you to give a creative response and you're going to find 708 00:48:49.440 --> 00:48:54.559 things that you never thought possible and maybe the exact thing you want happens amazing, 709 00:48:54.760 --> 00:49:00.119 maybe different thing happens great. Maybe you fail, then you learn something 710 00:49:00.119 --> 00:49:04.159 great. You know what, you fail that and you will probably not make 711 00:49:04.239 --> 00:49:07.760 a mistake again and hopefully will not be a million dollar mistake. I really, 712 00:49:07.880 --> 00:49:10.840 from the bottom my heart, to help nobody makes a million dollar mistake, 713 00:49:10.920 --> 00:49:17.079 because that's hurt but yeah, just be open the accepting of things and 714 00:49:17.159 --> 00:49:22.480 answer creatively to them. Yeah, I love it. I love have some 715 00:49:22.599 --> 00:49:27.000 grace, have some mercy on yourself, be willing to pivot. I love 716 00:49:27.079 --> 00:49:30.639 that because I think that is such a part. If anybody's is do this, 717 00:49:30.639 --> 00:49:35.400 this and that as a creator, as a business owner, entrepreneur, 718 00:49:35.519 --> 00:49:38.039 or probably even in your day job. It's like, I mean, there's 719 00:49:38.039 --> 00:49:42.079 a chance it's just not going to happen that way. So be open and 720 00:49:42.159 --> 00:49:45.880 be willing to pivot. Alex, I love it. Is there anything that 721 00:49:45.920 --> 00:49:49.039 I didn't always ask this question? Is there anything I didn't talk about that 722 00:49:49.079 --> 00:49:52.800 you wanted to cover or set you up for? I know I this was 723 00:49:52.880 --> 00:49:55.000 great. I love just having a conversation with another creator. I didn't feel 724 00:49:55.039 --> 00:50:00.000 pressured to bring a list of questions, so it's always a fun time w 725 00:49:59.960 --> 00:50:01.360 when we get to chat. I just want to make sure I give you 726 00:50:01.360 --> 00:50:07.000 another opportunity if I forgot some of you wanted to share. Now. I 727 00:50:07.039 --> 00:50:14.400 think we covered everything. I think let me leave meet me on second yeah, 728 00:50:14.400 --> 00:50:16.800 I think he covered everything. It's just like, be grateful with yourself. 729 00:50:16.920 --> 00:50:22.880 Chill, just I mean, most things have a solution. There are 730 00:50:23.039 --> 00:50:27.360 very few problems in this life that absolutely don't have a solution. That you're 731 00:50:27.360 --> 00:50:30.800 a creative. There are very few things. and honestly, like I have 732 00:50:30.840 --> 00:50:35.239 a podcast, like you said, I haven't posted an episode every weeks because, 733 00:50:35.239 --> 00:50:37.800 honestly, I got base creating other things. I could have been like 734 00:50:37.880 --> 00:50:40.840 done, I'm quitting. I didn't Keep Up Week Twenty Sive, like twenty 735 00:50:40.840 --> 00:50:45.440 seven episodes went perfectly out. Then I missed this one. I need to 736 00:50:45.480 --> 00:50:50.599 be grateful with myself and I still love editing episodes and making the podcast and 737 00:50:50.679 --> 00:50:52.280 having interviews is to really fun to me, so I'll continue to do it, 738 00:50:52.360 --> 00:50:55.840 like if it's my side thing, if it's my side holes, someone 739 00:50:55.960 --> 00:51:00.360 to be fun. It's a creative athlete. It's meant to be fun. 740 00:51:00.519 --> 00:51:05.519 Keep it fun, keeping it light, any little dabble of joy that you 741 00:51:05.599 --> 00:51:09.920 can find somewhere, take it and it love. There's a topic that you're 742 00:51:09.960 --> 00:51:15.599 not super interested in, find something to hold on to your life. If 743 00:51:15.639 --> 00:51:21.079 if you have a boring lecture or something that you don't like to find the 744 00:51:21.159 --> 00:51:23.800 one thing that you can hold onto, that can hold your attention and that 745 00:51:24.039 --> 00:51:28.880 will prop tell you into other steps. Always look for those Leto leaf frogs 746 00:51:28.920 --> 00:51:32.840 for that. It's like we're all just trying to find the next step, 747 00:51:32.840 --> 00:51:37.199 and the next step might not be what you expected, but there is the 748 00:51:37.239 --> 00:51:40.239 next step somewhere. To have to be a little bit creative to find it. 749 00:51:40.519 --> 00:51:44.960 Love it as that is such great advice. Just move the needle find 750 00:51:44.960 --> 00:51:49.360 your next step. On hundre, really appreciate you jumping on with me and 751 00:51:49.360 --> 00:51:51.519 I'm definitely going to have you back on the show again. I know you 752 00:51:51.559 --> 00:51:53.960 sent me a fun list of topics that we could have talked about, so 753 00:51:54.079 --> 00:51:57.599 definitely have you on. But thank you so much for being on here and 754 00:51:58.800 --> 00:52:00.320 I got all the ways that people can get in touch with you. Something 755 00:52:00.320 --> 00:52:04.559 to leave it in the show notes and the show description. So really appreciate 756 00:52:04.559 --> 00:52:07.239 you being on perfectly. Thank you so much for having me. This is 757 00:52:07.280 --> 00:52:12.159 really fun. Anytime. Absolutely. Thank you so much. And that is 758 00:52:12.199 --> 00:52:17.039 my friend only hundred, amazing podcast or amazing graphic designer, creative thinker. 759 00:52:17.079 --> 00:52:21.599 You can tell she's not stuck in a box and so hopefully that you're inspired, 760 00:52:21.679 --> 00:52:24.000 you're encouraged. Maybe a little entertaining as we were working through some techn 761 00:52:24.000 --> 00:52:28.119 difficulties, but that's part of it. I didn't just hit the Stop Button, 762 00:52:28.159 --> 00:52:30.239 I didn't just say well, I'll forget it, we'll just do some 763 00:52:30.280 --> 00:52:32.639 other time. I just went through the process and figure that out, as 764 00:52:32.639 --> 00:52:36.920 she was talking about and telling us how to do that. So be sure 765 00:52:36.960 --> 00:52:40.199 to check out her podcast. It is called do I need school to be 766 00:52:40.360 --> 00:52:45.559 dot dot dot. So go look that up and where she's having some amazing 767 00:52:45.599 --> 00:52:49.079 interviews with people talking about do I need to do? I need to go 768 00:52:49.119 --> 00:52:52.639 to school to do these kinds of things, and it sounds like that her 769 00:52:52.679 --> 00:52:57.840 and I really drive and think mentally about the school system kind of the same 770 00:52:57.880 --> 00:53:01.000 way. So Anyway, join US tomorrow, two PM Eastern time and be 771 00:53:01.079 --> 00:53:06.239 here with my friend Katie Brinkley talking about dominating with audio. She's been in 772 00:53:06.360 --> 00:53:10.119 radio, she has a podcast, she does social audio and she is dominating 773 00:53:10.159 --> 00:53:15.119 on these platforms and growing her business and growing her audience. And so join 774 00:53:15.199 --> 00:53:17.639 me tomorrow at two PM as and bring her on to talk about it. 775 00:53:17.679 --> 00:53:21.679 And I do want to say, and I didn't want to interrupt the conversation 776 00:53:21.800 --> 00:53:23.000 too much during the live stream, I want to say hi to my friend 777 00:53:23.000 --> 00:53:29.159 Michael still over in Sweden, to John over there on looks like Linkedin as 778 00:53:29.199 --> 00:53:31.559 well, and then, as always, my good friend knee over here in 779 00:53:31.639 --> 00:53:37.159 clubhouse and Joe and drew and John's here for joining me. Really appreciate you 780 00:53:37.199 --> 00:53:40.840 all and we will see you tomorrow at two PM once again be talking with 781 00:53:40.920 --> 00:54:00.480 Katie Brinkley about how you dominate with audio